Walton defender gets typing hand slapped in charter school debate | Arkansas Blog

Monday, March 16, 2015

Walton defender gets typing hand slapped in charter school debate

Posted By on Mon, Mar 16, 2015 at 5:25 PM

click to enlarge FOLLOW THE MONEY: That was Walton Business College prof Julie Trivitt's sneer at a Walton critic. The critic took her up on it.
  • FOLLOW THE MONEY: That was Walton Business College prof Julie Trivitt's sneer at a Walton critic. The critic took her up on it.
Mercedes Schneider is an education blogger. She once wrote a piece critical of the Waltons for what she described as education-on-the-cheap reform strategies built around charter schools.

For that, she got a sneering retort on Facebook from one Julie Stroud Trivitt, an economics faculty member at the Walton College of Business at the Waltons' university in Fayetteville, known by some as the University of Arkansas and home to the Walton-financed College of Education Reform.

Sneered Trivitt: 

I was not familiar with Mercedes Schneider before you mentioned her. I read on her blog for a few minutes. I will bet that if you follow the money, you will see she is funded by a teachers union.

Schneider responds to the specific in a full financial disclosure here. She is not funded by a teachers union. She IS a public school teacher, a job not held in high esteem by the Walton forces.

Here's Schneiders full put-down of Trivitt today. Highly recommended.

Waltonites tend think the rest of the world is like them — for sale. Jim Walton doesn't lavish money on people who can't be bought.

walton-uark.jpg

So, Ms. Trivitt — Follow the money? Yes, follow the damn money, to Kathy Smith, Laurie Lee, Gary Newton, Scott Smith, Bruce Cozart, Charlotte Douglas, Jane English, Bart Hester, Bill Gossage, most Republican legislators, the University of Arkansas, the UA College of Education Reform, the Walton College of Business, to Education Commissioner-to-be Johnny Key, Gov. Hutchinson and on and on and on.

Oh and speaking of Walton toadies:

Just got off the phone with Rep. John Walker. He was with Walton-financed lobbyists Gary Newton and Scott Smith when a process server called his phone and asked him how to find Newton to serve a subpoena to testify in the lawsuit opposing the Walton-backed takeover of the Little Rock School District for their grand privatization scheme.

Walker said, "He's right here. Come on over to the Capitol." He told Newton a process server was looking for him. Newton started walking. Fast. Walker followed. Newton sped up and finally broke into a run down the Capitol stairs, finally eluding the 77-year-old Walker.

Walker had it right, though. Newton can run. But he can't hide. Not if he's going to continue to do the Waltons' bidding in committee to pass the privatization bill.

See, Julie? See the money? See Gary run.

PS — Diane Ravitch is spreading the word by Twitter to her 107,000 followers about the Waltons purchase of Arkansas education and the Little Rock school district.

click to enlarge unnamed.jpg

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (20)

Showing 1-20 of 20

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-20 of 20

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Arkansas cities fare poorly on LGBT equality, save Eureka and Fayetteville

    The Human Rights Coalition has released of how some 500 U.S. cities stack up on equal treatment of LGBT people. On average, the eight cities ranked in Arkansas fared poorly.
    • Oct 23, 2017
  • Potlatch acquires Deltic Timber

    Two major woodlands companies, Potlatch and Deltic Timber, are combining in a stock deal that will leave Potlatch shareholders with 65 percent control of the new company, which will be organized as a real estate investment trust. Potlatch is acquiring Deltic by giving its shareholders 1.8 shares of Potlatch for each Deltic share, making the deal worth about $1.18 billion.
    • Oct 23, 2017
  • The Monday Democrat-Gazette was slimmer this morning

    Did your Monday morning Arkansas Democrat-Gazette include a business section?
    • Oct 23, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Charter school accountability: Non-existent in Arkansas

    A state audit finds charter school spending violated state law, but the state Education Department says it has no responsibility for ensuring proper management of charter schools. Say what?
    • Mar 5, 2016
  • The two cities of Little Rock: East/west, black/white

    The Little Rock City Board illustrated this week a community divided over public schools, another blow to the Little Rock School District and another illustration of the need for ward elections to the board.
    • Mar 23, 2017
  • The LR chamber does the public's business. Is it accountable? Blue Hog on the case.

    Matt Campbell, lawyer and Blue Hog Report blogger, has sent a Freedom of Information Act request to Jay Chessir, director of the Little Rock Regional Chamber of Commerce, and Mayor Mark Stodola related to the publicity stunt yesterday  built around withdrawing from the mayor's rash pronouncement that the city would seek an Amazon HQ2 project even though the city  didn't meet the company's criteria.
    • Oct 20, 2017

Most Shared

  • Discussion: State killing of the mentally ill

    The Arkansas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and others will have a forum on mental illness and the death penalty at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Bowen School of Law's Friday Courtroom.

Most Viewed

  • The Monday Democrat-Gazette was slimmer this morning

    Did your Monday morning Arkansas Democrat-Gazette include a business section?
  • Hog football: The lawyers take over

    If you believe social media, it's all over but the post-season buyout for Razorback football coach Bret Bielema. That means, in turn, that the issue of what the coach's contract buyout is worth is not just an academic question.
  • Might the Weinstein case lead to a safer world for women?

    The exposure of Harvey Weinstein's serial offenses against women is quickly progressing far beyond the story of one man. It has begun to raise the question of whether it might, in time, change the world in treatment of women.
  • Potlatch acquires Deltic Timber

    Two major woodlands companies, Potlatch and Deltic Timber, are combining in a stock deal that will leave Potlatch shareholders with 65 percent control of the new company, which will be organized as a real estate investment trust. Potlatch is acquiring Deltic by giving its shareholders 1.8 shares of Potlatch for each Deltic share, making the deal worth about $1.18 billion.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation