Arkansas conservatives react to same-sex marriage decision | Arkansas Blog

Friday, June 26, 2015

Arkansas conservatives react to same-sex marriage decision

Posted By on Fri, Jun 26, 2015 at 11:11 AM

SAD RAPERT: Standing in the gap (file photo). - BRIAN CHILSON
  • Brian Chilson
  • SAD RAPERT: Standing in the gap (file photo).

Jason Rapert, Mike Huckabee, the Meeks bros, Jerry Cox — beyond these extremists, it's hard to find statements from other Arkansas conservatives. That tell you something?

Sen. Jason Rapert (@jasonrapert) on Twitter: Never giving in. I am dedicated to restoring religious liberty & states rights. I am standing in the gap — it is here I shall live or die.

More Rapert: Marriage is between one man and one woman no matter what 5 unelected activist Supreme Court Judges say. #AppealToHeaven

Here's a helpful guide to understanding what's going on in Rapert's mind.

Rep. David Meeks (@David Meeks) on Twitter: For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness & unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness; Rom 1:18.

Rep. Stephen Meeks (@RepStephenMeeks) on Twitter: Sad day for America regardless of where you stand on the issue. It's a state issue and #SCOTUS should have left it with the states. #arleg

Mike Huckabee won't "acquiesce to an imperial court." What's that look like?

"The Supreme Court has spoken with a very divided voice on something only the Supreme Being can do-redefine marriage. I will not acquiesce to an imperial court any more than our Founders acquiesced to an imperial British monarch. We must resist and reject judicial tyranny, not retreat.

"This ruling is not about marriage equality, it's about marriage redefinition. This irrational, unconstitutional rejection of the expressed will of the people in over 30 states will prove to be one of the court's most disastrous decisions, and they have had many. The only outcome worse than this flawed, failed decision would be for the President and Congress, two co-equal branches of government, to surrender in the face of this out-of-control act of unconstitutional, judicial tyranny."

"The Supreme Court can no more repeal the laws of nature and nature's God on marriage than it can the law of gravity. Under our Constitution, the court cannot write a law, even though some cowardly politicians will wave the white flag and accept it without realizing that they are failing their sworn duty to reject abuses from the court. If accepted by Congress and this President, this decision will be a serious blow to religious liberty, which is the heart of the First Amendment."

Jerry Cox, one of Arkansas's leading bigots and president of the Family Council, says in a statement, "This situation is far from over." 

Today the U.S. Supreme Court ruled states do not have the constitutional authority to define marriage as the union of one man and one woman.

Family Council President Jerry Cox released a statement, saying, “Today’s ruling exemplifies judicial tyranny. Voters in more than three-fifths of the country democratically passed laws and amendments defining marriage in their respective states. Today’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling sends a very clear message that five unelected justices believe they have the power to disenfranchise fifty million American voters. It’s unthinkable.”

Cox said today’s ruling deepens divisions among Americans regarding marriage. “Unfortunately, this ruling does nothing to bring Americans willingly to any consensus on marriage. The court has offered its definition of marriage through this ruling, and that’s a definition tens of millions of voters still reject. This does not unite the nation. It further divides us.”

Cox said the court’s ruling is unprecedented. “The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled time and time again that the government has the power to define and regulate marriage. When it struck part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act in 2013, the court did so on the basis that marriage is something regulated by state government—not the federal government. Today the court has essentially said that state governments cannot regulate marriage, either. If the federal government cannot define or regulate marriage, and if state governments cannot define or regulate marriage, then tell me who can.”

Cox said today’s ruling calls into question the very meaning of marriage and family in America. “The question this ruling raises is ‘What is a marriage, and what is a family?’ If marriage can be between two men, why can’t it be between three or five? What is the logical argument for limiting it to just two people? We’re eliminating the very definition of marriage, and in so doing we are redefining the family as well.”

Cox said Family Council will work with attorneys and lawmakers to protect people of faith from discrimination as a result of today’s ruling. “Now that this ruling has been handed down, I believe a tidal wave of litigation is bound to unfold as gay activists try to force people of faith to violate their deeply-held religious convictions by aiding and participating in same-sex ceremonies in Arkansas and all across the country. We plan to work with our friends to ensure the freedoms of speech and religion are not squelched. One thing is for sure: This situation is far from over.”

Tags: , , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (36)

Showing 1-36 of 36

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-36 of 36

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • The Cotton, Boozman Nowhere to Be Found Edition

    Arkansas politicians and the health care overhaul and Russia investigation, the ascension of Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the firing of Pulaski County Superintendent Jerry Guess, the end of Riverfest, UA-LR and football and maybe more — all covered on the podcast.
    • Jul 21, 2017
  • Riverfest calls it quits

    The board of directors of Riverfest, Arkansas's largest and longest running music festival, announced today that the festival will no longer be held. Riverfest celebrated its 40th anniversary in June. A press release blamed competition from other festivals and the rising cost of performers fees for the decision.
    • Jul 18, 2017
  • The Power Ultra Fallout Edition

    The Power Ultra Lounge shooting and related political fallout, Secretary of State Mark Martin and Trump’s election integrity commission and former circuit judge Mike Maggio — all covered on this week's podcast.
    • Jul 7, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Federal judge wants John Goodson to explain class action maneuvering

    A show-cause order filed Monday by federal Judge P.K. Holmes of Fort Smith indicates class action attorney John Goodson has some explaining to do about the move of a class action complaint against an insurance company from federal to state court with an instant pre-packaged settlement that has been criticized as a windfall for Goodson.
    • Dec 22, 2015
  • Federal judge reprimands John Goodson for misconduct in class-action case

    John Goodson  — the Texarkana attorney, D.C. lobbyist, and husband of Arkansas State Supreme Court Justice Courtney Goodson — was reprimanded today by a federal judge for his conduct in a class-action case.
    • Aug 3, 2016
  • Al Gore remembers Dale Bumpers

    Former Vice President Al Gore, a former U.S. Senate colleague of Dale Bumpers, sent a statement on Bumpers' death Friday:
    • Jan 3, 2016

People who saved…

Most Shared

  • So much for a school settlement in Pulaski County

    The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette's Cynthia Howell got the scoop on what appears to be coming upheaval in the Pulaski County School District along with the likely end of any chance of a speedy resolution of school desegregation issues in Pulaski County.
  • Riverfest calls it quits

    The board of directors of Riverfest, Arkansas's largest and longest running music festival, announced today that the festival will no longer be held. Riverfest celebrated its 40th anniversary in June. A press release blamed competition from other festivals and the rising cost of performers fees for the decision.
  • Football for UA Little Rock

    Andrew Rogerson, the new chancellor at UA Little Rock, has decided to study the cost of starting a major college football team on campus (plus a marching band). Technically, it would be a revival of football, dropped more than 60 years ago when the school was a junior college.
  • Turn to baseball

    When the world threatens to get you down, there is always baseball — an absorbing refuge, an alternate reality entirely unto itself.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation