Photographer recounts formative experience in Arkansas | Arkansas Blog

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Photographer recounts formative experience in Arkansas

Posted By on Sun, Jul 5, 2015 at 4:43 PM

ROBERT FRANK/NY TIMES FROM PACE/MACGILL GALLERIES
  • Robert Frank/NY Times from Pace/MacGill Galleries

The New York Times today profiled Robert Frank, described as the most influential photographer alive, and his travels chronicling Americans and the American experience.

My attention was drawn to his 1955 photo above of people on a New Orleans streetcar. The caption said the picture was taken four days after an experience in Arkansas that "darkened his artistic viewpoint."

Indeed, the Swiss emigre tells of his trip across the country compiling photos for "The Americans":

Frank says he was most drawn to blacks: the bare-chested boy in the back of a convertible; the woman relaxing beside a field in sunny Carolina cotton country; the dignified men outside the funeral of a South Carolina undertaker, who uncannily bring to mind the day President Obama eulogized Clementa Pinckney. At first, the South was to him ‘‘very exotic — a life I knew nothing about.’’ Then, in November 1955, Frank was traversing the Arkansas side of the Mississippi River, ‘‘just whistling my song and driving on,’’ as he says, when a patrol car pulled him over outside McGehee. The policemen’s report noted that Frank needed a bath and that ‘‘subject talked with a foreign accent.’’ Also suspicious were the contents of the car: cameras, foreign liquor. Frank was on his way to photograph oil refineries in Louisiana. ‘‘Are you a Commie?’’ he was asked.

Ten weeks earlier, Emmett Till was murdered a hundred miles away. ‘‘In Arkansas,’’ Frank recalls, ‘‘the cops pulled me in. They locked me in a cell. I thought, Jesus Christ, nobody knows I’m here. They can do anything. They were primitive.’’ Across the room, Frank could see ‘‘a young black girl sitting there watching. Very wonderful face. You see in her eyes she’s thinking, What are they gonna do?’’ Because his camera had been confiscated, Frank considers the girl his missing ‘‘Americans’’ photograph. Around midnight a policeman told Frank he had 10 minutes to get across the river. ‘‘That trip I got to like black people so much more than white people.’’

Coming to America after growing up listening to tyranny on the radio, Frank had been foremost a grateful émigré, and early pictures suggested it. Now, through a lens, the country darkened, and Frank became, the photographer Eugene Richards says, ‘‘a loaded gun.’’ Four days later, in New Orleans, Frank photographed the line of faces looking through the trolley windows. Once he saw that girl in McGehee, he says, he knew what to look for.

The extensive story is good reading and packed with striking images by Frank.

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