Monday, July 13, 2015

CRJW moves to Main Street, announces leadership transition

Posted By on Mon, Jul 13, 2015 at 9:28 AM

click to enlarge DARIN GRAY
  • DARIN GRAY
CJRW, the advertising and public relations firm, has announced completion of its move from Capitol Avenue to a renovated building at Third and Main Streets with a new chief executive officer.

In a news release, the firm said Darin Gray, 50, president of the firm since early 2014, is now the chairman and chief executive officer, succeeding Wayne Woods, 67, who'd been CEO since 2010.

The transition was planned in 2013. Gray has been splitting time between the agency's Northwest Arkansas office and Little Rock, but now will be based primarily in Little Rock.


Here's the full release.

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