U.S. appeals court strikes down Texas voter ID law | Arkansas Blog

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

U.S. appeals court strikes down Texas voter ID law

Posted By on Wed, Aug 5, 2015 at 2:31 PM

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down Texas' voter ID law because it discriminated against minority voters. Of course it did. That was the idea.

The Arkansas Supreme Court struck down the Republican-backed Arkansas voter ID law for running afoul of the state constitutional prohibition on erecting additional barriers to voting from those outlined in the Constitution. Whether the Supreme Court, with a couple of new members, including Rhonda Wood, who functionally ran as a Republican, would produce the same outcome today is anybody's guess.


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