Milton Crenchaw, a Tuskegee airman, dies at 96 | Arkansas Blog

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Milton Crenchaw, a Tuskegee airman, dies at 96

Posted By on Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 6:45 AM

click to enlarge MILTON CRENCHAW
  • MILTON CRENCHAW
A friend and KARK report that Milton Crenchaw, an Arkansas native and original Tuskegee airman, has died in Atlanta at 96.

From the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History:

Milton Pitts Crenchaw, of the original Tuskegee Airmen, was one of the first African Americans in the country and the first from Arkansas to be trained by the federal government as a civilian licensed pilot. He trained hundreds of cadet pilots while at Alabama’s Tuskegee Institute in the 1940s and was the catalyst in starting the first successful flight program at Philander Smith College in Little Rock (Pulaski County) from 1947 to 1953. His combined service record extends for over forty years of federal service from 1941 to 1983 with the U.S. Army (in the Army Air Corps) and eventually the U.S. Air Force.

... After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, his focus shifted from living the life of a normal college student to flying in the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP), sponsored by the Army Air Corps, and becoming a flight instructor. This was possible due to the landmark government decision of December 1940 regarding the training and inclusion of black pilots in the army. This idea was first initiated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and then revisited by the Department of War in response to the shortage of personnel in the aviation, pilot, and engineering sectors of government. Crenchaw received partial training and physical examinations at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama, before returning to Tuskegee for another phase of primary instruction and advance courses in aviation piloting. He graduated with his civilian pilot license and then commercial pilot certificate on August 11, 1941. Crenchaw became a primary civilian flight instructor and eventually one of the two original supervising squadron commanders under Chief Pilot Charles A. Anderson. He and Charles Foxx were the first instructors for the first group of student pilot trainees between 1941 and 1946.

He retired from the Defense Department in 1972 and was a member of the Arkansas Aviation Hall of Fame. He and other Tuskegee airmen were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2007.

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