Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Ethics Commission to hold hearing on 22 potential violations by Dennis Milligan

Posted By on Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 12:24 PM

WO"RDS AND DEEDS: Dennis Milligan campaigned on a motto of obeying the law. He faces a hearing next week on 22 potential law violations.
  • WO"RDS AND DEEDS: Dennis Milligan campaigned on a motto of obeying the law. He faces a hearing next week on 22 potential law violations.

Blue Hog Report
has potentially good news on the ethics front.

He has received notice that the Ethics Commission will hold hearings on whether there's probable cause to believe Treasurer Dennis Milligan had committed multiple ethics violations. The significant thing is that the Commission declined to use a new "safe harbor" provision of the ethics law by which legislators and public officials can claim mistakes and correct them when brought to their attention without ethical penalty.

But the Ethics Commission is not allowing that defense for Milligan in a number of complaints made against Milligan by Matt Campbell, a Little Rock lawyer who writes Blue Hog Report. Specifically:

* Did Milligan violate state law by hiring two spouses of legislators — the husband of Rep. Nelda Speaks and wife of Sen. Alan Clark — without prior legislative approval?

* Did he offer jobs to people in return for campaign support and did he extend special privileges to employees of his when he was Saline circuit clerk so they'd work on his treasurer's campaign?

*  Did he use his Saline county public offices or equipment for campaign purposes?

* Did he properly repeat campaign expenses and in-kind contributions, including from current state employee Gary Underwood? Such questions touch, too, on unreported campaign work done for him by current employees Grant Wallace and Jason Brady while they were working for a political lobby.

* Did he improperly fail to report Facebook advertising placed by Jason Brady.

The hearing will be Jan. 22. The good news is that the "safe harbor" law apparently will not mean an automatic way around all ethics violations, if the Commission forges ahead with an adverse finding. It also continued attention to the long list of administrative and ethical miscues that have marked Milligan since he began running for the office.

Blue Hog wrote:

You may recall that Milligan attempted to avail himself of the new safe-harbor self-reporting provision of the ethics rules after the complaint was filed. You might also recall–perhaps with a good deal of retrospective humor–that Milligan and his attorney claimed that, as a result of the safe-harbor provision, the Commission would not investigate the bulk of the allegations against Milligan. This was incorrect; the Ethics Commission found that affirmative defense applicable only to six of the 28 allegations contained in the original complaint.

Tags: , , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (12)

Showing 1-12 of 12

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-12 of 12

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Tom Cotton suggests Dick Cheney as House speaker

    Yes. U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton told Politico he'd like to see Dick Cheny as House speaker.
    • Oct 12, 2015
  • Speaking of the Clinton Foundation: Returns in maize and beans

    A reporter for Politifact, the Pulitzer Prize-winning fact-checking organization, sent a reporter to Africa to see where money given to the Clinton Foundation has been put to work. He found tangible results.
    • Sep 6, 2016
  • Federal judge wants John Goodson to explain class action maneuvering

    A show-cause order filed Monday by federal Judge P.K. Holmes of Fort Smith indicates class action attorney John Goodson has some explaining to do about the move of a class action complaint against an insurance company from federal to state court with an instant pre-packaged settlement that has been criticized as a windfall for Goodson.
    • Dec 22, 2015

Most Shared

  • Conspiracy theorists

    Back in 2000, I interviewed Rev. Jerry Falwell on camera in connection with a documentary film of "The Hunting of the President," which Joe Conason and I wrote.
  • The health of a hospital

    The Medicaid expansion helped Baxter County Regional Medical Center survive and thrive, but a federal repeal bill threatens to imperil it and its patients.
  • Virgil, quick come see

    There goes the Robert E. Lee. But the sentiment that built the monument? It's far from gone.
  • Real reform

    Arkansas voters, once perversely skeptical of complicated ballot issues like constitutional amendments, have become almost comical Pollyannas, ratifying the most shocking laws.
  • That modern mercantile: The bARn

    The bARn Mercantile — "the general store for the not so general," its slogan says — will open in the space formerly occupied by Ten Thousand Villages at 301A President Clinton Ave.

Visit Arkansas

Paddling the Fourche Creek Urban Water Trail

Paddling the Fourche Creek Urban Water Trail

Underutilized waterway is a hidden gem in urban Little Rock

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

Slideshows

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation