Fracking-related earthquakes continue in Oklahoma | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Fracking-related earthquakes continue in Oklahoma

Posted By on Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 8:57 AM

click to enlarge EARTHQUAKE FUEL?: A fracking operation at work in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota. - WIKIPEDIA
  • WIKIPEDIA
  • EARTHQUAKE FUEL?: A fracking operation at work in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota.

DeSmog, a blog covering climate change and energy news, writes on fracking-related earthquakes in Oklahoma. Arkansas is again cited as a state that successfully began regulating disposal of fracking wastewater after evidence emerged that injection wells — in which spent large amounts of spent fracking fluid are forced underground for disposal — were responsible for increased earthquake activity.

“We are human guinea pigs in a fracking industry experiment,” Angela Spotts, founder of Stop Fracking Payne County and a Stillwater, Oklahoma homeowner, told DeSmog. “Regulators tell us they can get the earthquakes under control as they tinker with the quantity that wastewater wells are allowed to inject into the ground. But despite their efforts, the quakes have continued.”

Spotts’ group has called for a moratorium on injection wells that dispose of fracking wastewater. “Shutting the wells down stopped the earthquakes that hit Arkansas. That is what we need to do here too,” Spotts said. 

But that's not the only Arkansas connection. DeSmog interviews residents of Greenbrier, Ark. who say the wastewater resulting from ongoing fracking operations is being trucked to injection wells elsewhere. Specifically, Oklahoma.

It took a 4.7 magnitude earthquake that shook Greenbrier in 2011 to convince regulators to shut down the area’s wells. “Since then, the fracking wastewater has been trucked to Oklahoma. I see trucks that are hauling wastewater heading east on Interstate 40 for the state line all the time,” said DeTurck.

Skinner admits the OCC [the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, which regulates public utilities in the state] does not know exactly how much wastewater is coming into Oklahoma from Arkansas and other states. But he doesn’t think it is very much. The agency can’t track how much is delivered to private wells, but can obtain the records of what is received at commercial ones.

Ed Henshaw, an Oklahoma resident who lives near the Arkansas state line, doesn’t agree. During a hearing on earthquakes at the state capitol on January 15, he said he sees semi-truck after semi-truck hauling wastewater from Aransas on Interstate 40 across the state line into Oklahoma.

For more on the situation with fracking and seismic activity in Oklahoma, read Rivka Galchen's story in the New Yorker last year, "The Weather Underground."

Tags: , , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

More by Benjamin Hardy

Readers also liked…

  • Judge Griffen: Why black lives matter

    Another few words from Judge Wendell Griffen growing from the controversy over the sale of Black Lives Matter T-shirts at the state black history museum — removed by the administration and restored after protests from Griffen and others stirred by a story in the Arkansas Times:
    • Mar 13, 2016
  • Among the last words from Kenneth Williams: 'Finger Lickin' Good Fried Chicken'

    What's purported to be a final-words essay from condemned prisoner Kenneth Williams was distributed today by Deborah Robinson, a freelance journalist in Arkansas.  He reflects on his execution, his victims, reactions of inmates and big servings of fried chicken, which he says are given to all inmates on execution days.
    • Apr 27, 2017
  • IHOP coming down, but .....

    I always scan the Little Rock City Board for items of interest this week and this one caught my eye: A zoning measure required by a proposal to tear down the IHOP at Markham and University.
    • Apr 30, 2016

Most Shared

Most Viewed

  • Ole Miss apologizes to Houston Nutt, settles his lawsuit

    Tom Mars, attorney for Houston Nutt, the former Arkansas and Ole Miss football coach, called my attention this morning to news that Nutt had settled his lawsuit against Ole Miss officials for speaking negatively about him despite a no-disparagement agreement with the school following his departure as head coach.
  • Environmental group finds agricultural chemicals in Arkansas drinking water

    The Environmental Working Group released a report this week that asserts that the drinking water for about 200,000 Arkansans contains unsafe levels of chemicals related to industrial agriculture. Another environmental group has used the occasion to call for Tyson Foods to do something about it.
  • Little Rock to reveal bid for Amazon headquarters

    Thursday is the deadline for cities to make a pitch for Amazon's second headquarters and Little Rock will unveil its proposal at a 10:30 a.m. news conference Thursday in the Venture Center in the city's Technology Park development on Main Street.
  • Additional allegations against pediatrician in sexual assault case

    KATV reports that police have increased the number of allegations of sexual assault against Dr. James Nesmith, a former pediatrician at Arkansas Children's Hospital and a staff member at UAMS.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation