Trump and Sanders handily sweep New Hampshire primary election | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Trump and Sanders handily sweep New Hampshire primary election

Posted By on Tue, Feb 9, 2016 at 9:14 PM

click to enlarge SANDERS: Wins New Hampshire with a commanding lead. - GAGE SKIDMORE / WIKIPEDIA
  • Gage Skidmore / Wikipedia
  • SANDERS: Wins New Hampshire with a commanding lead.

Donald Trump
and Bernie Sanders have won the New Hampshire presidential primary elections by wide margins.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, the GOP's most moderate candidate, placed a distant but respectable second to Trump on the Republican side. With 85 percent of precincts reporting at 11:45 p.m. CST, Kasich took about 16 percent of the vote. Trump more than doubled that, at around 35 percent. 

Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio jostled for third place; each had about 11 percent of the New Hampshire vote. UPDATE, 2/10/16: After all votes were tallied, Cruz made it to 12 percent (rounding up).

Among Democrats, Sanders beat Hillary Clinton by over twenty percentage points: 60-38 at the moment. Yes, Sanders is a senator from neighboring Vermont. But he's also a democratic socialist whose candidacy was considered absolutely marginal just a year ago. No longer. UPDATE, 2/10/16: The final tally was 60.4 percent to 38.0 percent.

There will be plenty of discussion about these results tomorrow. Right now, I just suggest you read Matthew Yglesias at Vox.

Whether Sanders wins or not, Yglesias argues, he's already remaking the Democratic Party:

To Clinton, Democrats are the party of progressives, and so stuff that Democrats routinely do is, by definition, compatible with being progressive.

But though Democrats are certainly the more left-wing of the two parties — the party of labor unions and environment groups and feminist organizations and the civil rights movement — they're not an ideologically left-wing party in the same way that Republicans are an ideological conservative one. Instead, they behave more like a centrist, interest group brokerage party that seeks to mediate between the claims and concerns of left-wing activists groups and those of important members of the business community — especially industries like finance, Hollywood, and tech that are based in liberal coastal states and whose executives generally espouse a progressive outlook on cultural change.

Sanders's core proposition, separate from the details of the political revolution, is that for progressives to win they need to first organize and dominate an ideologically left-wing political party that is counterpoised to the ideological right-wing Republican Party.

And Donald Trump? Oh, he's winning, all right.

Last week's humbling second-place finish in Iowa reinforced the party's assumption that Trump will inevitably implode, even now, and that another candidate (one who isn't Ted Cruz, that is) will stand to consolidate the anti-Trump contingent in the GOP once other candidates begin dropping out. That may happen. Then again, it might not, Yglesias writes:

[T]here's little reason to believe that actual voters endorse the "lanes" schema that political journalists have embraced. Voters who like Christie's tough-talking persona may be drawn to Trump as the next best thing. Kasich and Trump stand out as the two candidates in the field who are a bit soft on the welfare state. Rubio and Trump are running on similar themes of rescuing the United States from Obama-induced decline. And then of course national polling still shows a healthy ten percent of Republicans backing outsider figures Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina, who may naturally gravitate toward Trump.

Finally, though it's surely a sin to revel in the sheer chaos of it all, read these "9 things we learned about American politics this February," including:

1. Party elites don't really matter and endorsements are a terrible predictor of primary outcomes.
2. Retail politics isn't important, especially in New Hampshire.
3. Socialist is a winning affiliation in American politics.

And:

9. Being a member of the political party whose nomination you're running for confers absolutely no advantage in winning said nomination.

Tags: , , , ,


Favorite

Comments (20)

Showing 1-20 of 20

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-20 of 20

Add a comment

More by Benjamin Hardy

Readers also liked…

  • Trump immigration protest at LR: Quick and fierce

    It was not even 24 hours ago that Sophia Said, director of the Interfaith Center; City Director Kathy Webb and others decided to organize a protest today of Donald Trump's executive order that has left people from Muslim countries languishing in airports or unable to come to the US at all — people with visas, green cards,a  post-doc graduate student en route to Harvard, Google employees abroad, families. I got the message today before noon; others didn't find out until it was going on. But however folks found out, they turned out in huge numbers, more than thousand men, women and children, on the grounds of the state Capitol to listen to speakers from all faiths and many countries.
    • Jan 29, 2017
  • Your daily dose of Jason Rapert

    Sen. Jason Rapert really, really didn't like it when a KATV reporter asked him about the hypocrisy of his political arguments.
    • Feb 4, 2017
  • Tom Cotton's influence on Trump's new security chief

    U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton is getting credit for pushing President Donald Trump to select Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as his national security adviser, Politico reports.
    • Feb 21, 2017

Slideshows

Most Viewed

  • Cody Wilson, the Arkansas-born plastic gun promoter, charged with sexual assault

    Cody Wilson, the Little Rock native who burst into national prominence with plans for printing plastic guns, has been arrested for sexual assault in Texas.
  • The LR mayor candidates on the big ballot issues

    Some big elections face voters this year, including the hot race for Little Rock mayor and, depending on court actions, as many as five very big statewide ballot issues. I decided to sample the five mayoral candidates on the ballot issues. In the end, the big three candidates — Frank Scott Jr., Warwick Sabin and Baker Kurrus — were more alike than different.
  • Sorry, haters, Hillary Clinton won't shut up

    I spoke briefly with HIllary Clinton Sunday night after her talk at the Clinton Library and encouraged her to keep giving the opposition hell. "What else is there to do?" she replied.And, boy, has she.
  • Tom Cotton believes Brett Kavanaugh

    U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton appeared on a conservative radio show yesterday and said, "My opinion of Judge Kavanaugh has not changed. He's made an unequivocal and categorical denial of these 36-year-old allegations and every known fact so far supports that denial".
  • Supreme Court sheds some light on dark political money

    This could be big. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a conservative political group must disclose donors who pay for its explicitly political ads in the coming midterm elections.

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation