Thursday, June 30, 2016

KKK thinks it may rise again

Posted By on Thu, Jun 30, 2016 at 12:32 PM

click to enlarge ARKANSAS KLANSMEN: They rallied at the Capitol aas recently as 1994. - DIXIE KNIGHT/ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ARKANSAS
  • Dixie Knight/Encyclopedia of Arkansas
  • ARKANSAS KLANSMEN: They rallied at the Capitol aas recently as 1994.

The Associated Press decided
the 150th anniversary of the Ku Klux Klan was a good time to let some of their people have a platform to express their hope for restoring the empire.

You ignore fringe thinkers at your peril, of course. See the apparent Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, whose appeal just so happens to mesh with a lot of what the KKK stands for. Cue the obligatory appearance of the perpetual Klansman who lives near Harrison:

"You know, we began 40 years ago saying we need to build a wall," Arkansas-based Klan leader Thomas Robb said.

Years ago, the group Robb heads near Harrison, Arkansas, changed its name from the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan to the Knights Party USA, mainly to get away from the stigma associated with the Klan name. It now presents itself as more of a political or Christian entity.

"There is a lot of baggage with the name," said Rachel Pendergraft, Robb's daughter, who leads the group with him. "You say the name 'KKK' and a lot of people have a narrative in their minds of what it is about, what it does. The name resonates with people, whether it is good or whether it is bad."
Resonance? Dissonance is more like it.





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