Atlanta Police Foundation helps police live in the city | Arkansas Blog

Monday, August 1, 2016

Atlanta Police Foundation helps police live in the city

Posted By on Mon, Aug 1, 2016 at 1:24 PM

click to enlarge atlanta.jpg
Here's some recommended reading for city officials. It's a story about the nonprofit Atlanta Police Foundation, which is providing financial assistance to help city police officers live in Atlanta. 

In Atlanta, less than 25 percent of the police officers live within the city's limits. In Little Rock, about 35 percent of its police officers live in the city (and by percentage, far fewer white officers live in the city than black officers do).

Little Rock City Director Erma Hendrix has twice proposed a residency requirement for LRPD officers. That seems unlikely to gain sufficient support on the board. What about an incentive plan?

[Officer Mike] Costello, 28, bought this three-bedroom bungalow in Atlanta’s Edgewood neighborhood in April as part of a new program by the Atlanta Police Foundation to help more officers live within the city limits. As tensions have heightened nationwide between police and the communities they serve, the program in Atlanta – which launched before the most recent demonstrations – aims to include officers as part of those communities.

In Atlanta, less than about 25 percent of police officers live within the city’s limits, said Marlon Trone, vice president of programs at the Atlanta Police Foundation.

“We’re trying desperately to change the culture, change the percentage,” Trone said. “We are actively pursuing officers, engaging them, and making – adding those extra layers of incentives for them to move and relocate.”

Costello said he’d been eyeing living in Edgewood for a while, but that the prices on homes had been too high. ...

“I didn’t really dream of owning a home before I was 30, so I’m very happy about it,” Costello said.

As part of the program, the police foundation helped to renovate the house, which had been previously blighted property, and helped Costello with closing costs. He also receives a $300 stipend a month. In turn, Costello said he has promises to the community he has to keep, like going to neighborhood meetings and doing what are known as “knock and talks.” 

“I’ll just be going up to people’s houses, knocking on the door. Hopefully, they’ll want to speak to me. It’s a positive visit. I’m not executing a search warrant or anything like that,” Costello said. “I really just want to get to know them.”

Tags: , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • The Cotton, Boozman Nowhere to Be Found Edition

    Arkansas politicians and the health care overhaul and Russia investigation, the ascension of Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the firing of Pulaski County Superintendent Jerry Guess, the end of Riverfest, UA-LR and football and maybe more — all covered on the podcast.
    • Jul 21, 2017
  • Riverfest calls it quits

    The board of directors of Riverfest, Arkansas's largest and longest running music festival, announced today that the festival will no longer be held. Riverfest celebrated its 40th anniversary in June. A press release blamed competition from other festivals and the rising cost of performers fees for the decision.
    • Jul 18, 2017
  • The Power Ultra Fallout Edition

    The Power Ultra Lounge shooting and related political fallout, Secretary of State Mark Martin and Trump’s election integrity commission and former circuit judge Mike Maggio — all covered on this week's podcast.
    • Jul 7, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • So much for a school settlement in Pulaski County

    The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette's Cynthia Howell got the scoop on what appears to be coming upheaval in the Pulaski County School District along with the likely end of any chance of a speedy resolution of school desegregation issues in Pulaski County.
  • Riverfest calls it quits

    The board of directors of Riverfest, Arkansas's largest and longest running music festival, announced today that the festival will no longer be held. Riverfest celebrated its 40th anniversary in June. A press release blamed competition from other festivals and the rising cost of performers fees for the decision.
  • Football for UA Little Rock

    Andrew Rogerson, the new chancellor at UA Little Rock, has decided to study the cost of starting a major college football team on campus (plus a marching band). Technically, it would be a revival of football, dropped more than 60 years ago when the school was a junior college.
  • Turn to baseball

    When the world threatens to get you down, there is always baseball — an absorbing refuge, an alternate reality entirely unto itself.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Another week done

    • More news on the "unmasking scandal" and it even shows up on a conservative news…

    • on July 21, 2017
  • Re: Another week done

    • "Analysis of the tortured syntax in Trump's New York Times interview suggests mental decline or…

    • on July 21, 2017
  • Re: Trump at work on obstructing justice; French Hill dodging questions

    • Razor--"How about covering up the cause of the American deaths at Benghazi..." How many official…

    • on July 21, 2017

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation