Sierra Club rips Rutledge for opposing clean air rules | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Sierra Club rips Rutledge for opposing clean air rules

Posted By on Tue, Sep 27, 2016 at 9:08 AM

Oral arguments were presented to a federal appeals court in Washington today by a group of Republican-led states, including Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge, challenging the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan to reduce power plant pollution that contributes to global warming.

The Sierra Club noted that changes in energy mix have already brought Arkansas close to goals in the pollution-reduction plan, but, said a release,  "Attorney General Rutledge is still pursuing legal means to stop the Clean Power Plan and protect dirty coal usage."

Glen Hooks, the Sierra Club's leader in Arkansas, added:

"While Attorney General Rutledge is in DC again, wasting Arkansas tax dollars and protecting polluters, Arkansans are busy building a clean energy future for our state. Arkansas is adding hundreds of megawatts of clean solar and wind energy while our largest power plants are burning dramatically reduced amounts of dirty coal. In fact, Arkansas is now on pace to exceed its carbon reduction goals early—but Rutledge still opposes the Clean Power Plan's common-sense protections for our air, water, and health.

Our Attorney General is supposed to stand up for ordinary Arkansans. Instead, Rutledge has repeatedly—and unsuccessfully—brought multiple expensive lawsuits aimed at dismantling clean air and clean water protections for our citizens. This is far worse than a mere dereliction of duty: Rutledge is actively using Arkansas tax dollars to scuttle important clean air and clean water protections.

The Arkansas Sierra Club supports the Clean Power Plan as a way to improve our health, clean up our air and water, and create thousands of good-paying jobs here in Arkansas. While Attorney General Rutledge rubs elbows in Washington, D.C. with corporate polluters and brings baseless lawsuits on their behalf, we will continue to welcome and work for a clean energy future throughout Arkansas."
Rutledge styles her work to protect polluters as a fight against excessive regulation and she says cleaner power plants could cause higher electric rates.

Tags: ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • When Johnny Reb comes marching to Hot Springs

    They are assembling for and against white supremacist symbols in Hot Springs today. Photographs by Brian Chilson of the Arkansas Times.
    • Aug 19, 2017
  • Dixie's Defenders and the scrapheap of history

    And you thought the Civil War was over. Supercharged by a neo-Nazi march in Charlottesville and Donald Trump's signal of sympathy, the Rebel remnants of America and assorted white supremacists, bigots and garden variety nuts have taken up arms in defense of symbols of the Lost Cause.
    • Aug 19, 2017
  • Inside the Charlottesville march with the neo-Nazis

    Vice has compiled a powerful documentary inside the white supremacist march that turned violent in Charlottesville last weekend.
    • Aug 19, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Al Gore remembers Dale Bumpers

    Former Vice President Al Gore, a former U.S. Senate colleague of Dale Bumpers, sent a statement on Bumpers' death Friday:
    • Jan 3, 2016
  • 'Million-Dollar Thursday': A visit to Sherwood's hot check court

    We take a visit to the weekly hot check court in Sherwood District Court, the subject of a recent civil rights lawsuit filed by ACLU Arkansas and others, who say the system there results in a modern-day debtor's prison
    • Aug 25, 2016
  • Super Bowl line

    Over to you.
    • Feb 7, 2016

Most Shared

  • Take yourself there: Mavis Staples coming to LR for Central High performance

    Gospel and R&B singer and civil rights activist Mavis Staples, who has been inspiring fans with gospel-inflected freedom songs like "I'll Take You There" and "March Up Freedom's Highway" and the poignant "Oh What a Feeling" will come to Little Rock for the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the desegregation of Central High.
  • Klan's president

    Everything that Donald Trump does — make that everything that he says — is calculated to thrill his lustiest disciples. But he is discovering that what was brilliant for a politician is a miscalculation for a president, because it deepens the chasm between him and most Americans.
  • On Charlottesville

    Watching the Charlottesville spectacle from halfway across the country, I confess that my first instinct was to raillery. Vanilla ISIS, somebody called this mob of would-be Nazis. A parade of love-deprived nerds marching bravely out of their parents' basements carrying tiki torches from Home Depot.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation