Pryor family provides optimistic outlook on former senator | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Pryor family provides optimistic outlook on former senator

Posted By on Thu, Oct 13, 2016 at 4:19 PM

click to enlarge DAVID PRYOR: Family reports progress after stroke treatment.
  • DAVID PRYOR: Family reports progress after stroke treatment.
Through a family friend, I've gotten an update on retired Sen. David Pryor, 82, who has been hospitalized at Washington Regional Medical Center in Fayetteville since suffering a stroke Monday. The outlook is optimistic.

Said the family through the spokesman:

"He has made it through the first critical 48 hours. He is recovering as well as the doctors had hoped. They expect the progress to continue, but he faces an extended period of rehabilitation and physical therapy."

Pryor's condition is markedly better because of the speed with which treatment, including surgery, began. 

The family added that visits are still restricted to family.

As luck, if that is the word, had  it, Pryor was taken to a hospital that last year recruited a pair of doctors — brothers who'd fled religious persecution in Iran — who are experts in advanced stroke care.

This article in Arkansas Medical News last year tells about Drs. Mayshan and Mahan Ghiassi, said to be two of only about 100 surgeons in the U.S. trained in both endovascular and conventional neurosurgery.  The opening of the article explains why their presence was important in surgery to deal with a stroke caused by a blood clot:

In just the past year, minimally invasive endovascular neurosurgery for strokes and other cerebrovascular conditions has become the preferred standard of care. When treated in a timely manner, patients paralyzed on one side and\or unable to speak are often able to walk and talk within an hour. That is accomplished by using radiological imaging to guide a tiny catheter from an artery in the groin to the site to be treated. Clots can be removed without the risks and recovery time associated with open surgery.
The doctors were recruited from Nashville to an underserved area with a high stroke rate and have had more work than expected, according to the article.

Given the current political context, I found the brothers' journey to the U.S. illuminating:
The Ghiassi brothers were born in Iran. The family, members of the Baha’i faith persecuted in the predominantly Muslim country, fled in 1985. They spent a year in a refugee camp in Pakistan before they were sponsored and brought to Nashville, Tenn., when Mahan was 5 and Mayshan was 7. That is where the family continued to live up until the brothers finished medical school, residencies and fellowships at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Their parents relocated with their sons, their wives, and their grandchildren. Mahan has three children, and Mayshan has one with another expected soon. 

Tags: , , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • When Johnny Reb comes marching to Hot Springs

    They are assembling for and against white supremacist symbols in Hot Springs today. Photographs by Brian Chilson of the Arkansas Times.
    • Aug 19, 2017
  • Dixie's Defenders and the scrapheap of history

    And you thought the Civil War was over. Supercharged by a neo-Nazi march in Charlottesville and Donald Trump's signal of sympathy, the Rebel remnants of America and assorted white supremacists, bigots and garden variety nuts have taken up arms in defense of symbols of the Lost Cause.
    • Aug 19, 2017
  • Inside the Charlottesville march with the neo-Nazis

    Vice has compiled a powerful documentary inside the white supremacist march that turned violent in Charlottesville last weekend.
    • Aug 19, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Al Gore remembers Dale Bumpers

    Former Vice President Al Gore, a former U.S. Senate colleague of Dale Bumpers, sent a statement on Bumpers' death Friday:
    • Jan 3, 2016
  • Trump immigration protest at LR: Quick and fierce

    It was not even 24 hours ago that Sophia Said, director of the Interfaith Center; City Director Kathy Webb and others decided to organize a protest today of Donald Trump's executive order that has left people from Muslim countries languishing in airports or unable to come to the US at all — people with visas, green cards,a  post-doc graduate student en route to Harvard, Google employees abroad, families. I got the message today before noon; others didn't find out until it was going on. But however folks found out, they turned out in huge numbers, more than thousand men, women and children, on the grounds of the state Capitol to listen to speakers from all faiths and many countries.
    • Jan 29, 2017
  • Super Bowl line

    Over to you.
    • Feb 7, 2016

Most Shared

  • Take yourself there: Mavis Staples coming to LR for Central High performance

    Gospel and R&B singer and civil rights activist Mavis Staples, who has been inspiring fans with gospel-inflected freedom songs like "I'll Take You There" and "March Up Freedom's Highway" and the poignant "Oh What a Feeling" will come to Little Rock for the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the desegregation of Central High.
  • Klan's president

    Everything that Donald Trump does — make that everything that he says — is calculated to thrill his lustiest disciples. But he is discovering that what was brilliant for a politician is a miscalculation for a president, because it deepens the chasm between him and most Americans.
  • On Charlottesville

    Watching the Charlottesville spectacle from halfway across the country, I confess that my first instinct was to raillery. Vanilla ISIS, somebody called this mob of would-be Nazis. A parade of love-deprived nerds marching bravely out of their parents' basements carrying tiki torches from Home Depot.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation