President-elect Trump claims without evidence that massive voter fraud kept him from popular vote win | Arkansas Blog

Sunday, November 27, 2016

President-elect Trump claims without evidence that massive voter fraud kept him from popular vote win

Posted By on Sun, Nov 27, 2016 at 3:13 PM

Here's a flat lie, an outrageous claim made without evidence, likely gleaned from conspiracy fan-fic in the nether regions of the internet. Only instead of the drunk guy in the comments section, it's the president-elect of the United States of America.  The sore winner Trump's ego is too fragile and his skin is too thin to accept that more Americans voted for Hillary Clinton. The next four years will be an interesting test for our institutions. Elections have consequences and here we are: Our Dear Leader, the authoritarian clown, routinely tossing off utter fabrications and paranoid fantasies in public temper tantrums. Trump clearly plans to use his office to take advantage of the bulls**t pulpit.

p.s. Trump's unhinged demagoguery will be roundly condemned (or awkwardly dismissed by GOP lawmakers), as per usual, but remember that a massive voter suppression effort is coming from Trump and the Republican party, which now control every lever of federal power. Trump's obvious nonsense can be seen as a preview for the cover arguments they'll use.

p.p.s. If you haven't read about Trump's tangled web of global conflicts of interest that could allow him to use his office for massive personal  financial gain at the expense of the nation he serves, or his small-bore schemes to rip off American taxpayers, or his actual (wildly unpopular) policy agenda and its real-world impacts, make sure you do! For whatever reason, he's not tweeting about that stuff.

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