Under Trump, these renowned Fayetteville neurosurgeons would have been banned from coming to the U.S. | Arkansas Blog

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Under Trump, these renowned Fayetteville neurosurgeons would have been banned from coming to the U.S.

Posted By on Sat, Jan 28, 2017 at 7:43 PM

click to enlarge STROKE CARE SPECIALISTS: Dr. Mahan Ghiassi and Dr. Mayshan Ghiassi of Washington Regional Hospital. - WASHINGTON REGIONAL
  • Washington Regional
  • STROKE CARE SPECIALISTS: Dr. Mahan Ghiassi and Dr. Mayshan Ghiassi of Washington Regional Hospital.

President Trump's executive order on immigration has sparked chaos and outrage around the world. From the New York Times:

There were numerous reports of students attending American universities who were blocked from returning to the United States from visits abroad. One student said in a Twitter post that he would be unable to study at Yale. Another who attends the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was refused permission to board a plane. A Sudanese graduate student at Stanford University was blocked for hours from entering the country.

Human rights groups reported that legal permanent residents of the United States who hold green cards were being stopped in foreign airports as they sought to return from funerals, vacations or study abroad.
There are stories all over the web and TV about the people who are being detained. It's also worth remembering the folks who're already here, but wouldn't have been allowed in under a Trump administration. Hat tip to NWA politico Will Watson, who on Twitter reminded me of Dr. Mahan Ghiassi and Dr. Mayshan Ghiassi of Washington Regional Hospital in Fayetteville. They're two of about 100 doctors in the U.S. who're trained in minimally invasive endovascular neurosurgery and conventional neurosurgery, according to Arkansas Medical News. They're experts in advanced stroke care. Retired Sen. David Pryor credits them with saving his life. Guess what? They're refugees.

The Ghiassi brothers were born in Iran. The family, members of the Baha’i faith persecuted in the predominantly Muslim country, fled in 1985. They spent a year in a refugee camp in Pakistan before they were sponsored and brought to Nashville, Tenn., when Mahan was 5 and Mayshan was 7. That is where the family continued to live up until the brothers finished medical school, residencies and fellowships at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Their parents relocated with their sons, their wives, and their grandchildren. Mahan has three children, and Mayshan has one with another expected soon. As for their hobbies, right now their off duty world revolves primarily around spending time with their family.

Meanwhile, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported this morning on an 18-year-old woman from El Salvador, who came to the U.S. as an unaccompanied minor. Her immigration court case had been continued until March 2018 because of a backlog of similar cases, but she was detained by federal officials on Friday. It's unclear if Homeland Security has officially changed its enforcement policies in the wake of Trump's executive order.

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