U.S. Supreme Court taking longer look at Arkansas birth certificate case | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

U.S. Supreme Court taking longer look at Arkansas birth certificate case

Posted By on Tue, May 30, 2017 at 9:58 AM

I reported last week that the U.S. Supreme Court could have decided to hear an Arkansas case over birth certificates for children of same-sex couples but put it off at least for a week.

Noted today is the fact that the U.S. Supreme Court again failed to issue an order on this case and the fact that the court requested the record of the case May 23 from the Arkansas Supreme Court. So perhaps something is cooking.

This is the case in which the Arkansas court said against  science and reason that heterosexual married couples were entitled to presumptive listing on birth certificates but  same-sex married couples were not. The majority opinion made the  claim that this is done for biological recordkeeping reasons, since both parents in a same-sex partnership could not be parents. They are thus required to get court clearance as parents while heterosexual parents — though beneficiaries of donor sperm or egg for pregnancy — face no such challenge. It seems an affront to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the same-sex marriage case — a fact even the Arkansas attorney general, now officially defending the discrimination in birth certificate issuance, had all but conceded during oral arguments on the case before the Arkansas Supreme Court.

Also on hold is the Colorado case over a baker who refused to bake a cake for a same-sex marriage.

Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Industrial hemp pilot program coming soon to Arkansas

    One of the booths at this week's Ark-La-Tex Medical Cannabis Expo was hosted by the Arkansas Hemp Association, a trade group founded to promote and expand non-intoxicating industrial hemp as an agricultural crop in the state. AHA Vice President Jeremy Fisher said the first licenses to grow experimental plots of hemp in the state should be issued by the Arkansas State Plant Board next spring.
  • The prayers of Rapert

    Sen. Jason Rapert is keeping a close eye on the Alabama Senate race.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation