Blues Trifecta places a sure bet at UA – Pulaski Tech on September 21 | Arkansas Blog

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Blues Trifecta places a sure bet at UA – Pulaski Tech on September 21

Posted By on Wed, Sep 13, 2017 at 1:29 PM

NORTH LITTLE ROCK- University of Arkansas – Pulaski Technical College will present Blues Trifecta, an evening of American roots and blues music, film and history, with a presentation of the award- winning documentary film Two Trains Runnin’, a performance by legendary blues artist Jimmy “Duck” Holmes, and a presentation by legendary blues promoter and photographer Dick Waterman. The event is Thursday, Sept. 21 at 7 p.m. at the Center for Humanities and Arts (CHARTS) on the UA – Pulaski Tech Main campus at 3000 West Scenic Drive in North Little Rock. Tickets are priced at $25 for reserved seats and $50 VIP tickets include premium reserved seating plus access to the “Blues and BBQ” VIP Room sponsored by Whole Hog Café featuring award-winning BBQ and drinks.

Tickets go on sale Monday, August 14 at UAPTC.edu/charts.

click image blues-trifecta-poster-finalsmall.jpg
Dick Waterman, featured in Two Trains Runnin’, will be begin the evening by taking the audience on an up-close-and-personal journey through the blues as he experienced it first-hand. He will share a selection of his rare photos and stories of these blues legends as he photographed them along the way. Waterman is best known as the legendary blues promoter and photographer who is credited with rediscovering Son House and Skip James in Mississippi. He managed Son House, Skip James, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Junior Wells, Arthur Crudup and he started the career of Bonnie Raitt as he persuaded her to perform, opening up for these blues legends. In 2000, he was inducted in the Blues Hall of Fame as one of the first non-performers to be honored.

Performing second, Jimmy “Duck” Holmes, 70, of Bentonia, MS., is one of the most celebrated rural blues musicians performing today and is also one of the last of the Bentonia blues stylists made famous by Skip James and Jack Owens. He is the proprietor of the Blues Front Café, the oldest operating juke joint in Mississippi. His professional career dates from the early 1970’s and he has appeared at major blues and roots music festivals across the USA and internationally. He is currently managed by Waterman and was recently featured on the cover of Living Blues Magazine in July 2017.

To complete the Blues Trifecta evening, Two Trains Runnin’, an 80-minute award-winning documentary by Avalon Films and Freedom Road Productions, follows the true story of the search for two forgotten blues singers in Mississippi during the height of the civil rights movement. The film is directed by acclaimed filmmaker Sam Pollard and narrated by Common. Musicians in the film include Gary Clark Jr., Buddy Guy, Jimbo Mathus, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Valerie June, Chris Thomas King, North Mississippi Allstars, and Lucinda Williams.

About Two Trains Runnin’: In June of 1964, hundreds of college students, eager to join the civil rights movement, traveled to Mississippi, starting what would be known as Freedom Summer. That same month, two groups of young men—made up of musicians, college students and record collectors—also traveled to Mississippi. Though neither group was aware of the other, each had come on the same errand: to find an old blues singer and coax him out of retirement. Thirty years before, Son House and Skip James had recorded some of the most memorable music of their era, but now they seemed lost to time. Finding them would not be easy. There were few clues to their whereabouts. It was not even known for certain if they were still alive.
And Mississippi, that summer, was a tense and violent place. With hundreds on their way to teach in freedom schools and work on voter registration, the Ku Klux Klan and police force of many towns vowed that Freedom Summer would not succeed. Churches were bombed, shotguns blasted into cars and homes. It was easy to mistake the young men looking for Son House and Skip James as activists. Finally, on June 21, 1964, these two campaigns collided in memorable and tragic fashion.
Two Trains Runnin’ not only pays tribute to a pioneering generation of musicians. The movie cuts to the heart of our present moment, offering a crucial vantage from which to view the evolving dynamics of race in America.

Learn more at twotrainsrunnin.com/abouthefilm.

University of Arkansas – Pulaski Technical College provides access to high-quality education that promotes student learning and enables individuals to develop to their fullest potential.

For more information, contact Shannon Boshears, UA-PTC vice-chancellor of advancement at 501-812-2221 or sboshears@uaptc.edu.



Tags: ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

More by Sponsored

  • The games we used to play on road trips

    Before iPads, Kindles, and other handheld devices were always inches away, it took more creativity to keep yourself entertained. Here are a few of the games we used to play to keep busy on the road.
    • Sep 11, 2017
  • Take a road trip with Rover

    If you aren’t planning outdoor activities to take advantage of this Arkansas fall weather, you should be! With the right planning, even your furry best friend won’t be able to take part in the fun. Pack your pup and your gear and and get going.
    • Sep 7, 2017
  • Veggie grillin' with Mark – the "Produce Man" at Edwards Food Giant

    Simple veggie grilling tips from Mark, the "Produce Man," at Edwards. He's got a few ideas for what you can do with their fresh Olathe corn, Vidalia onions and peppers.
    • Sep 6, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Judge Griffen: Why black lives matter

    Another few words from Judge Wendell Griffen growing from the controversy over the sale of Black Lives Matter T-shirts at the state black history museum — removed by the administration and restored after protests from Griffen and others stirred by a story in the Arkansas Times:
    • Mar 13, 2016
  • A response to police arrests becomes a tutorial on race, class and policing in Little Rock

    John Walker, the 79-year-old civil rights lawyer, and his associate, Omavi Shukur, 29, a young lawyer devoted to criminal justice reform, talked to press this afternoon about their arrests Monday by Little Rock police for supposedly obstructing governmental operations in observing and attempting to film a routine police traffic stop. It was a tutorial on sharp views of race, class and governance in Little Rock.
    • Sep 29, 2016
  • Judge anticipates punishment of lawyers in Fort Smith class action case

    Federal Judge P.K. Holmes of Fort Smith issued a 32-page ruling yesterday indicating he contemplates punishment of 16 lawyers who moved a class action lawsuit against an insurance company out of his court to a state court in Polk County after a settlement had been worked out.
    • Apr 15, 2016

Most Shared

  • ASU to reap $3.69 million from estate of Jim and Wanda Lee Vaughn

    Arkansas State University announced today plans for spending an expected $3.69 million gift in the final distribution of the estate of Jim and Wanda Lee Vaughn, who died in 2013 and 2015 respectively.
  • Bad health care bill, again

    Wait! Postpone tax reform and everything else for a while longer because the Senate is going to try to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act one more time before September ends and while it can do it with the votes of only 50 senators.
  • Sex on campus

    Look, the Great Campus Rape Crisis was mainly hype all along. What Vice President Joe Biden described as an epidemic of sexual violence sweeping American college campuses in 2011 was vastly overstated.

Most Viewed

  • Death reported of Robert Johnston, former legislator and homeless advocate

    In a cruel coincidence, a new development in the city's ongoing struggle with how to deal with the homeless came the day of news of the unexpected death of Robert Johnston,  a tireless advocate for the homeless in a long career of public service.
  • Legislature itches for more control over 'independent' agencies

    Michael Wickline of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports this morning on growing tension over the legislature's effort to exert more control over the state's constitutionally independent agencies. The immediae target is the Game and Fish Commission, but it's a sprawling dispute over balance of powers.
  • Who you gonna trust? Not GOP politicans on health care

    Gov. Asa Hutchinson keeps insisting that the Graham-Cassidy Obamacare repeal will be great for Arkansas. Evidence keeps mounting that it will strike the state (meaning Arkansas human beings) a devasting blow.
  • Alternate homeless feeding plan falls apart

    A plan to establish a volunteer effort to feed homeless in the far southeastern corner of the city, well removed from downtown, has fallen apart as was inevitable.
  • Police shoot suspect in SW Little Rock

    TV news accounts this morning say a Little Rock police officer shot a criminal suspect near a church at 53rd and Geyer Springs around midnight last night when investigation what's been described as a potential rape.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation