Art Note: Ben Whitehouse and Jun Kaneko at the Arts Center | Rock Candy

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Art Note: Ben Whitehouse and Jun Kaneko at the Arts Center

Posted By on Wed, Jun 17, 2009 at 10:48 AM

click to enlarge unknown.jpg

From Whitehouse's Central Park video.
Thanks to the medium of video, the Ben Whitehouse and Jun Kaneko exhibits at the Arkansas Arts Center require more than just a casual drop-in. Whitehouse’s real-time video landscapes — of Central Park, a bowl of fruit and the Lake Michigan shore — are hypnotic. So is the soundless video showing Kaneko in the process of building and firing his enormous ceramic sculptures, cutting, pounding, pinching, stacking, painting; the first image is the sun rising, the last is the moon.

There is so much going on in these fine exhibits that words fail, both visually and intellectually. Whitehouse’s large-scale paintings of distant shores and luminous lakes and big sky and Kaneko’s giant “dangos” and bird’s egg blue Buddha head are gorgeous works of art. Whitehouse’s digital videos (24 hours long) are his attempt at creating living landscape. Though he is a deft painter, he wants to capture more.
In the Jeannette Rockefeller gallery, “Revolution: Bowl of Fruit” video is still life and unstill life, both cerebral and funny. The bowl of fruit is unchanging; the landscape, seen through a window in the background, is ever-changing, leaves blowing in a wind, people walking on the beach.
The constant break of the waves on the shore of Lake Michigan in another video (which also uses sound to great effect) is nature unstoppable. The video of Central Park, shot from above, captures the sunlight’s slip from across the Sheep Meadow, the skating rink, the vast stretch of trees in fall, until the park is in shadow. Only the movement of the skaters isn’t subtle.

Along with his traditional landscape paintings is “March,” a collection of square canvasses, arranged like a calendar, depicting a place on the shore, each day different from the last.

In the Wolfe gallery, Kaneko’s 6- and 7-foot dangos stand like pieces of the landscape removed from Whitehouse’s two-dimensional reality. One, zigzagged in gold and blue lines, is like a smooth glazed cactus. There are also those that can’t be translated into something organic, like the black-and-white-striped lozenge that, like a large abstract painting, makes design monumental. An observer can get lost in the moonscape surface of the Buddha head.

The exhibit runs through Aug. 2.

Leslie Peacock

From the ArkTimes store



Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • The Students Make Themselves Heard Edition

    Challenges to the state medical marijuana commission’s grading of cultivation applications, the just concluded special session of the legislature, Governor Hutchinson’s politicking, students protesting gun violence and another civil rights lawsuit from Mike Laux targeting the Little Rock Police Department and the city of Little Rock — all covered on this week's podcast.
    • Mar 16, 2018
  • 'The Conversation' with Todd Yakoubian

    In this week's edition of our breakout new podcast, "The Conversation," host Matt Price interviews KATV Meteorologist Todd Yakoubian. They cover a range of issues including climate change, why the Ozark Mountains are the reason Little Rock doesn't get much snow and fake news in the weather world.
    • Mar 15, 2018
  • Faring well

    Tomas Bohm's new deli is on its way.
    • Mar 15, 2018
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Coming Monday: Little Rock Black Restaurant Week

    MoTown Monday is Ceci's Chicken and Waffles. Tasty Tuesday is Sims BBQ and Brewster's Soul Food Cafe. Wing Wednesday is Chicken King and Chicken Wangs. Soul Food Thursday is Lindsey's BBQ and Hospitality House and Food Truck Festival Friday is @station801. It's the first Black Restaurant Week.
    • Mar 8, 2017
  • New music from Isaac Alexander

    New music from Isaac Alexander.
    • Jul 14, 2017
  • No Small Talk Ep. 8: Katy Henriksen, Springs Arts preview

    A packed episode this week of "No Small Talk": a chat with Katy Henriksen, from Of Note on KUAF; Stephanie Smittle breaks down the Spring Arts issue; and we finish up with just a tiny bit of Oscar chatter.
    • Mar 9, 2018

Most Shared


© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation