Televisionist: Another take on 'Treme' | Rock Candy

Monday, May 17, 2010

Televisionist: Another take on 'Treme'

Posted By on Mon, May 17, 2010 at 4:55 PM

click to enlarge unknown.jpg


New contributor John Earney took issue with my critique of "Treme" last week, and fired back this retort.

I have no clue how it can even be suggested that “Treme” is not rife with the finger-snapping, cigarette-break-inducing, intense dramatic edge that David Simon has become known for — character-driven shows about the America we don't care to think about. Sure, we all know that Katrina was terrible and the policy was ridiculous and George Bush hated black people, but saying that David Simon can't find drama in this situation is like saying a hand-drawn cartoon about the Holocaust isn't Oscar bait.

Simon succeeds in zeroing in on this type of devastation and personalizing it — whether it's a Mardi Gras chief trying to find and accommodate his tribe or a talented chef struggling to keep her restaurant afloat, it's the human element that keeps “Treme” afloat.

Putting a city as culturally unique and rich as New Orleans under the microscope does tend to have an alienating effect on the viewer, which, as Lindsey put it, can “sometimes make you feel bad for not knowing what's up.” I think this actually makes “Treme” that much more powerful — you're not told to feel guilty, but you do. It's mind boggling that some of these characters are able to keep going after Katrina, but what allows them to forge ahead is exactly what “Treme” is about.

In “Treme,” Simon explores the cement that held New Orleans together, and not surprisingly, the answer is the culture — specifically the music. The music numbers are long, but effective. Watching a show about New Orleans that brushes over the music would be like taking a drive-by tour of the Grand Canyon. That's not to say I dig all of the music; I'm not crazy about most of the songs Sonny (Michiel Huisman) plays, but after all, he's this season's Pete Campbell.

John Earney


Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • New ownership for District Fare, H.A.M.'s Brandon Brown managing

    Tomas Bohm, the owner of The Pantry and The Pantry Crest, has sold District Fare, his Hillcrest sandwich shop at 2807 Kavanaugh Blvd., to Little Rock restaurateur Daniel Bryant.
    • Aug 16, 2018
  • Kaleidoscope Film Festival continues

    And much more.
    • Aug 16, 2018
  • The Trouble Brewing in the LRSD Edition

    The potential coming conflict between the Hutchinson administration and the Little Rock Education Association, a federal court ruling on student transfers and allegations of another debtor’s prison — all covered on this week's podcast.
    • Aug 10, 2018
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Coming Monday: Little Rock Black Restaurant Week

    MoTown Monday is Ceci's Chicken and Waffles. Tasty Tuesday is Sims BBQ and Brewster's Soul Food Cafe. Wing Wednesday is Chicken King and Chicken Wangs. Soul Food Thursday is Lindsey's BBQ and Hospitality House and Food Truck Festival Friday is @station801. It's the first Black Restaurant Week.
    • Mar 8, 2017
  • New music from Isaac Alexander

    New music from Isaac Alexander.
    • Jul 14, 2017
  • No Small Talk Ep. 8: Katy Henriksen, Springs Arts preview

    A packed episode this week of "No Small Talk": a chat with Katy Henriksen, from Of Note on KUAF; Stephanie Smittle breaks down the Spring Arts issue; and we finish up with just a tiny bit of Oscar chatter.
    • Mar 9, 2018

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation