Fluke fanzine celebrates 25 years with anniversary edition | Rock Candy

Friday, September 2, 2016

Fluke fanzine celebrates 25 years with anniversary edition

Posted By on Fri, Sep 2, 2016 at 8:54 AM

click to enlarge MITCHELL CRISP
  • Mitchell Crisp

Anyone who's dabbled in the ink-stained, cut-and-paste world of fanzines knows it's a labor of love, and former Dogtown resident Matthew Thompson is celebrating the silver anniversary of Fluke, a fanzine that was instrumental in giving voice to the punk scene in Little Rock during the 1990s, "7th-and-Chester-style," as Thompson says, referring to the shows at Vino's Brewpub. 

click to enlarge shows.jpg

Originally conceived by Thompson, Steve Schmidt and Jason White (of Green Day fame), who departed from the zine's creation in favor of other pursuits, the 25th anniversary edition is Thompson's 68-page "love letter to Little Rock" [Thompson's words] with two variant covers: a tattoo flash-style art cover from Mitchell Crisp, illustrations from John Pugh (Vision Control, formerly of !!!) and another featuring Ben Sizemore of Econochrist, politico-punk rockers who got their start in Little Rock before gravitating to the Bay Area punk scene.

click to enlarge Jason White at 7th and Chester, circa 1990. - MATTHEW THOMPSON
  • Matthew Thompson
  • Jason White at 7th and Chester, circa 1990.

Thompson's kept the zine going, publishing at irregular intervals from a new headquarters in Phoenix, Ariz., and has dedicated the anniversary edition to the people whose elbow grease kept that early 1990s Little Rock scene alive:
In the late ‘80s, a punk rock scene began to grow out of an art space on the corner of 7th Street and Chester in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas. It switched hands and names, from Urbi et Orbi to DMZ to Nemesis, then Mandrake’s before Henry bought the place, built a pizzeria and named it Vino’s.

Most people outside of Little Rock won’t recognize most names within this issue, but the names are not very significant. What matters is the connection that was made between teenagers all over the city who found each other at the only “alternative” space Little Rock had at the time. I believe that’s what we all truly crave - a common bond. Something to grab onto and call our own.

This bond that was formed on that corner has stuck and what was once a scene is now something much deeper and more meaningful. To me, punk rock has always been about building something and the greatest structure erected from it has been the friendships we’ve made, and continue to make. It was built from the ground up. Fletcher Clement booked the shows, Colette Tucker hung the flyers, Mitchell Crisp designed the t-shirts and record covers and John Pugh published fanzines. James Brady, Andy Conrad and Colin Brooks played in the bands. Dozens of others did their part, from working in copy shops to taking out the trash at the end of the night.
click to enlarge Steve Schmidt, May 2016. - MATTHEW THOMPSON
  • Matthew Thompson
  • Steve Schmidt, May 2016.

The 25th anniversary edition features a 12-page spread on Tav Falco and Panther Burns, reflections from Clement, Tucker, Crisp, Conrad, Brady and Brooks, and art that will make you feel like it's 1993 again. Nate Powell, Eisner Award recipient, creator of the "March" comic book trilogy, and former member of Soophie Nun Squad designed a t-shirt to celebrate and to help fund distribution of the zine. Get the zine here, or if you're waxing nostalgic, send $5 to: Fluke, P.O. Box 1547, Phoeniz, AZ, 85001. 

click to enlarge NATE POWELL
  • Nate Powell

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Sign up for the Daily Update email
Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Stephanie Smittle

  • A Q&A with Trina Robbins

    On Yiddishkeit and fishnets.
    • Apr 19, 2018
  • Ozark Foothills Film Fest returns

    And much more.
    • Apr 19, 2018
  • Painter Barry Thomas channels "Pastorale" at ASO's Beethoven concert

    The accompanying painting was, by agreement between the artist and the musicians, not predetermined. Structures emerged and then disappeared behind a broad brushstroke, with Thomas pausing between each movement when the music stopped momentarily. It was, as Mann put it, “an immediate result of the sound that he hears. None of us know what it will look like and tomorrow, he’s gonna do it again and it’ll be a completely different painting.”
    • Apr 14, 2018
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Coming Monday: Little Rock Black Restaurant Week

    MoTown Monday is Ceci's Chicken and Waffles. Tasty Tuesday is Sims BBQ and Brewster's Soul Food Cafe. Wing Wednesday is Chicken King and Chicken Wangs. Soul Food Thursday is Lindsey's BBQ and Hospitality House and Food Truck Festival Friday is @station801. It's the first Black Restaurant Week.
    • Mar 8, 2017
  • New music from Isaac Alexander

    New music from Isaac Alexander.
    • Jul 14, 2017
  • No Small Talk Ep. 8: Katy Henriksen, Springs Arts preview

    A packed episode this week of "No Small Talk": a chat with Katy Henriksen, from Of Note on KUAF; Stephanie Smittle breaks down the Spring Arts issue; and we finish up with just a tiny bit of Oscar chatter.
    • Mar 9, 2018

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: The freeze comin' open line

    • allen, the connections between localized low temperature excursions and overall global warming have been explained…

    • on April 16, 2018
  • Re: The freeze comin' open line

    • no true redneck would be named vlad vlad. how about vladbob? i like vlad vlad…

    • on April 16, 2018
 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation