Northwest Arkansas Times to C.A.T. activists: Drop Dead | Street Jazz

Sunday, February 21, 2010

Northwest Arkansas Times to C.A.T. activists: Drop Dead

Posted By on Sun, Feb 21, 2010 at 10:49 AM

Well, at least they didn’t use the word “aginner” in the editorial this time.

Friday’s editorial in the NWA Times - “Glad CAT Fight Is Over” - was an eye-opener for some public access activists   who may have been operating under the mistaken belief that the newspaper had been taking any of their concerns seriously.

In part, the editorial says:

We’re going to follow our own advice here and ignore the personality clashes that led to the resignation of long-time CAT manager Sky Blaylock on Thursday. What really matters is whether cable subscribers xan reliably turn on their TVs and see content of public interest . . .

Did those from the Times have that mind set while listening to C.A.T. producers they were in conversations with, humoring them, while at the same time deciding that their concerns weren’t even worth the bother of looking into?

Putting it all down to a He said/she said situation  certainly means that the fighting journalists at the NWA Times can devote their time to other, more important matters. But whatever those matters are, they probably won’t include covering local citizen activists - unless they are Tea Party folks, that is.

For two decades, the NWA Times has had an uncomfortable relationship with activists in this community The term “aginner” - a slur tossed against those that the power structure decided were against “progress” - was coined by the Times.

It always been pretty difficult - outside of the letters column - to get your voice heard if you are on activist. You aren’t exactly on anyone’s speed dial down there.

Folks in authority, now, they have something of value to say.

******

About those personal threats against  the C.A.T. “Board member”

Interesting how the Times managed to gloss over the so-called “personal threats” and harassment” that were alleged by an anonymous “board member” in their editorial.

The board member in question is C.A.T. Board president Dedra Leaf, whom the Times has relied upon so much for quotes in recent days on the situation.

Ms. Leaf made the wild (and unfounded) accusation that a producer had made a threatening gesture towards her, and that I myself had written threatening emails - none of which  she was able to produce when an FOIA request  was sent in her direction.

The Times is well aware of all of this behavior, and still chose to steadfastly ignore it.

There are those in the C.A.T. community who feel that the Times has let them down, that they had cause to trust that the newspaper would give them a fair shake, and look into their concerns. As for me, this ain’t my first rodeo.

I’ve been here before.

*****

Quote of the Day

Most of our so-called reasoning consists in finding arguments for going on believing as we already do - James Harvey Robinson

****

On the Air - WAOKA

Monday night at 7pm the musical group WAOKA will be my guests.

The husband-and-wife duo of Randy and Allyson Covey are an acoustic and saxophone duo who perform music with a blend of  folk, blues, country, and Americana sound with a unique blend of harmonies.  The West Fork couple have been entertaining Northwest Arkansas for several years, and have released a recent album.

They will perform several of their songs on the program. For more information about WAOKA:

http://www.waokamusic.com/fr_index.cfm


Show days and times

Monday (7pm)
Tuesday (noon)
Saturday (6pm)

C.A.T. is shown on Channel 18 of the Cox Channel line-up in Fayetteville.  

Those outside the Fayetteville viewing area can see the program online at:

http://www.catfayetteville.org/

Programs online are shown in “real time,” meaning that they are shown at the same time as they are shown on C.A.T.

rsdrake@cox.net

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