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A Work of Art 

WEDNESDAY 8/1

A WORK OF ART

Various times and venues. $20-$50.

Art Porter Music Education Inc. was created to continue the legacy of the late Art Porter Sr. and Art Porter Jr. The nonprofit offers scholarships to promising young Arkansas musicians. The elder Porter was a teacher and notable player in the Little Rock scene. The younger Porter grew up playing music and was in his father's band for years before striking out on a successful solo career, including several albums on PolyGram and Verve Records. His life and music career were tragically cut short in 1996, when he was killed in a boating accident in Thailand. This week-long festival, which got started Monday, is in its second year. It's the primary fundraiser for the APME and includes concerts at several venues. On Wednesday, Sway hosts shows at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. with Little Rock born bassist James Leary, who played with Porter Sr. as well as numerous jazz legends such as Max Roach, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Pharaoh Sanders and many others. On Thursday, the Porter Players are at The Afterthought for a free jam session starting at 8 p.m. Pianist Alex Bugnon, who played the festival last year, is at Cajun's Wharf, 9 p.m., $25. And on Saturday, the festivities wrap up with a big show at Clear Channel Metroplex, featuring jazz and R&B vocalist Will Downing, The Fingerprints Band and Lex Porter, the grandson of Porter Sr. and the nephew of Porter Jr.

THURSDAY 8/2

MALCOLM HOLCOMBE

9 p.m. White Water Tavern. $7.

I'm pretty sure that the Times has written a preview of every show that Malcolm Holcombe has played in Little Rock. We might have missed one somewhere along the line, but I doubt it. So by now, regular readers ought to be familiar with the North Carolina native. But there's always a straggler here and there, and those poor souls don't deserve to be left out. So to recap: Malcolm Holcombe is a helluva songwriter, as gifted with the haunting dirge as he is with the quiet folk meditation. As a guit-box picker, he's fleet-fingered as they come, and he has this unconventional approach to the instrument — namely, he smacks it like a drum and every so often he'll pluck one of the high strings so hard it sounds like a ricochet in an old Western movie. He's a rascally teller of stories that don't add up on the front side, but instead sneak in the back and drop a cherry bomb down the kitchen sink while you're still on the front porch trying to figure out what the hell. He has a gravelly growl, enough make even the meanest and most unscrupulous of tow-truck drivers apologize and then let down their rig, backpedaling the whole time — "Sorry man, sorry, my mistake." Holcombe's latest record, "Down the River," is great. It's got guest vocal spots from Emmylou Harris and Steve Earle and has some other big-deal musicians playing on it too, and as usual, the songwriting quality is high. But as good as his recordings are, seeing Holcombe play live is an experience on another level. He can create a vibe in the room like very few other performers I've ever seen.

FRIDAY 8/3

BATTERY — MASTERS OF METALLICA

9 p.m. Revolution. $8 adv., $10 day of.

On a fateful day in 1989, a friend loaned me his cassingle copy of Metallica's "One" (B side: a cover of Diamond Head's "The Prince"). I took it home, ka-chunked it into the tape deck of my cheap Sanyo boom box, and what came out of the speakers a few seconds later would forever warp my mind and my sensibilities and my view of the world and of politics and most especially of music and what it could be. But on their breakthrough 1991 self-titled album, Metallica went soft. I felt heartbroken and betrayed and tried in vain to like the album, but to no avail. But still, the first four Metallica albums are, to my mind, four of the greatest albums of all time. I never got to see Metallica during their heyday, though some friends swear that they still kill live. I don't know, maybe a tribute band is as close to the real Metallica experience as one can get. This one, called Battery after the classic "Master of Puppets" track, has opened for the actual Metallica. They played Metallica songs and Metallica played the cover songs they'd recorded for their "Garage Inc." album. This show is 18-and-older.

FRIDAY 8/3

SIXPENCE NONE THE RICHER

9 p.m. Juanita's. $20.

Pop fans will likely remember Sixpence None the Richer from the CCM group's huge hit "Kiss Me," which I thought was a Cardigans song for the longest time. In 1999, the band had a hit with a cover of The La's "There She Goes," which put a contemporary sheen on the original's vintage production and Byrds-y jangle. In 2003, Sixpence struck adult contemporary gold again with a cover of the Crowded House hit "Don't Dream It's Over." The core duo of Leigh Nash and Matt Slocum broke up in 2004, but reunited a few years later. "Lost in Transition," the band's sixth studio album, is due out next week. The opening bands are Sleeperstar and Satellite.

FRIDAY 8/3

GLITCHCON 2012

11:30 a.m. Bentonville Doubletree Guest Suites. $20-$45.

Do you need approximately 56 to 72 hours of LARP, CCG, cosplay, steampunk, sci-fi, anime, video games and more? Then you'd best get yourself and all your assorted gear up to Bentonville this weekend for GlitchCon 2012: The Last Con on Alderaan. This fan convention is a three-day celebration of all those aforementioned things (Alderaan is the planet that Princess Leia hails from, non-geeks). In addition to all the gaming and the costume contest, there will be guest speakers. One of the guest speakers is Charles Martinet, an actor and public speaker who has also done voiceover work for numerous video games, including the voices of Mario, Wario, Luigi and Donkey Kong for the Nintendo 64. I would estimate that I've heard Martinet's voice saying, "Hey, it's me, Mario on Nintendo 64!" at least 40 hundred million times. It was during a brief, nearly life-ruining stint working the overnight shift at Toys 'R' Us. There was a Nintendo 64 display unit that repeated this phrase over and over at top volume all night as we restocked the shelves. Nobody could figure out how to turn the damn thing off or even how to lower the volume, and to this day, the haunting refrain echoes in my mind's ear. I can hear it even now ... Anyways, other guests include HALO voice talent Steve Downes, sci-fi and YA authors Kevin J. Anderson and Rebecca Moesta and many more. There'll be music from DJs Azrael and Infam0us and most importantly, plenty of chances for hot nerd-on-nerd action at the sure-to-be raging afterparties.

FRIDAY 8/3

THE WICKED GOOD

10 p.m. White Water Tavern.

OK ya'll, this right here is a good ol' fashioned rock show, the kind that people will tell stories about in years to come, the kind that'll make your ears ring and your liver cry out for mercy (maybe), the kind that'll result in legendary bar tabs. The Wicked Good, as you're no doubt already aware, is one of the state's finest rock 'n' roll organizations. You might not know that this will be the band's final performance with singer and guitarist David Slade. So to ensure a proper send-off, this show promises to be an extra hard-rocking affair. Don't say you weren't warned. Also performing will be the bruising and contusing Jab Jab Suckerpunch and the awesomely named Peckerwolf.

SATURDAY 8/4

MC CHRIS

9 p.m. Juanita's. $13 adv., $15 door.

So I suppose I have to mention the whole imbroglio that erupted a couple of weeks back around writer, voice actor and nerdcore practitioner MC Chris. Basically, a fan at one of his shows in Philadelphia tweeted that he didn't like opening act Richie Branson and then MC Chris got mad about that tweet and he called the dude out by name and kicked him out of the show, and then a ton of angry Internet users used the Internet to attack him for kicking the dude out, and then he used the Internet to issue a tearful apology and then all these other people used the Internet to be mean to him and make fun of his tearful apology. I guess it was a fairly big deal for a second, but anyways, moving on, MC Chris is on a tour right now with sci fi- and video game-themed metal band Powerglove and rapper Richie Branson.

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