Favorite

Another run at Joan Adcock 

Hard to say. It could mean that Adcock is the most vulnerable to being unseated. But given that she’s running against only two other candidates this time around — compared with five last time and six the time before that — it could also mean that folks are less willing to take her on. Adcock, not surprisingly, likes the latter explanation. "There’s less every time," she said. "I must be doing something right." Adcock, who’s earned a reputation as a bulldog fighter on behalf of the city’s neighborhood groups, is running for a fourth four-year term as an at-large member of the city board. The Southwest Little Rock resident runs the Hope Center, an organization that helps people move off the welfare rolls and into regular jobs. She’s running against two opponents who appear to have about as little in common with each other as they do with Adcock: Kevin Dedner, a 1995 graduate of Central High School who’s worked for the Democratic Party and is now the government relations director for the Arkansas chapter of the American Cancer Society; and Bill Rector, a well-known former real estate developer who now publishes the Daily Record newspaper and has served on the Little Rock Planning Commission for a total of 13 years. Not surprisingly, Rector has attracted the support of some in the development community, but he said he prefers to think his strength is in knowing how to bring opposite sides together. "I’ve been a developer… but I’ve also spent 13 years on the civic side of this thing listening to citizens and staff talk about what the problems are," he said. Dedner said growing up in Little Rock’s inner city — and choosing to return even though he could live elsewhere — informs his ideas about how the city should progress. His theme: responsible growth and quality of life. Dedner’s the only candidate who doesn’t seem to mind the phrase "impact fees" — "You can look 40 miles up the road [in Conway] and see where impact fees are working well," he said — but "responsible growth is not an anti-development message." It includes talking about preserving Fourche Creek and trying to find somewhere other than the Pinnacle Valley area for a new sewer plant, he said.
Favorite

From the ArkTimes store

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Jennifer Barnett Reed

  • Learning to love North Little Rock in Park Hill

    Any description of North Little Rock's Park Hill neighborhood will eventually, inevitably, include a comparison to Hillcrest, its better-known cousin south of the river.
    • Dec 28, 2011
  • A reason to splash

    Fun rain gear and more at InJoy.
    • Mar 12, 2009
  • Pick up some spice

    And we ain’t talking about tarragon.
    • Feb 26, 2009
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • The ballad of Fred and Yoko

    How one of the world's foremost Beatles collectors died homeless on the streets of Little Rock.
    • Mar 31, 2016
  • 2016 Best of Arkansas editors' picks

    A few of our favorite things.
    • Jul 28, 2016
  • Visionary Arkansans 2016

    They make an impact.
    • Sep 15, 2016

Most Shared

  • Discussion: State killing of the mentally ill

    The Arkansas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and others will have a forum on mental illness and the death penalty at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Bowen School of Law's Friday Courtroom.

Latest in Cover Stories

Event Calendar

« »

October

S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31  

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: 'Every day was a Tuesday'

    • Perceptions of being affected by Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by the…

    • on October 22, 2017
 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation