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Coralie 
Member since Jun 21, 2010


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Re: “Monitoring Main Street

Just when did the word 'terrorism' stop meaning state terrorism, as in Soviet Russia under Stalin or Nazi Germany, and start applying only to small quasi-military groups or fanatical individuals?

Posted by Coralie on 12/20/2010 at 11:32 AM

Re: “Let the hostilities resume

"In the USA, no one is forcing anyone to work. You can CHOOSE to work for minimum wage or not." Sure, nobody is forcing you to eat or to sleep in a bed instead of under the bridge.
Take a cup of Borderer ideology, add 1/2 cup of Horatio Alger, mix in Social Darwinism until morally righteous, then bask in the glow.

Posted by Coralie on 12/20/2010 at 11:25 AM

Re: “Good night ladies ...

Sorry for the glitch.
I just found the following online, a UK history site. It doesn't describe all the Borderers, of course, just a subset.
"The Border Reivers were bands of brigands, organized in family groups (rather like the Clans of the Highlands of Scotland) who caused anarchy in the lands on either side of the Scotland-England Border for over 300 years, from the 13th Century until the early years of the 17th Century. They committed theft, robbery, 'recett' (the selling on of stolen goods), murder, wounding, arson, kidnapping and extortion. Their actions introduced words such as "Blackmail", "Bereaved" and "Gang" into the English language."
Remember the bushwhackers of Civil War days?
According to Fisher, some of the outlaw families from the British Isles became prominent in the United States.






Posted by Coralie on 11/22/2010 at 1:48 PM

Re: “Good night ladies ...

Re: “Good night ladies ...”
Thanks, el.wood. I didn't do all that research about the Borderers myself. See a book by historian David Hackett Fisher titled ALBION'S SEED. It's about four different streams of immigration from England in the 17th and 18th centuries.
The biggest group by far was from the borders of north England and lowland Scotland (thus, Borderers). Some of them emigrated to northern Ireland before emigrating to the colonies.
They were poor, Calvinist, proud, and had been victimized for centuries by fighting across the border by the kings of England and Scotland. So they developed a warrior culture themselves.
You don't have to read the whole book, but the part about the Borderers shows some very persistent folkways from then to now.

Posted by Coralie on 11/21/2010 at 3:38 PM

Re: “Good night ladies ...

Thanks, el.wood. I didn't do all that research myself but found the results in a book by historian David Hackett Fisher titled ALBION'S SEED. It's about four different streams of immigration from England in the 17th and 18th centuries. The biggest group by far was from the borders of north England and lowland Scotland (thus, Borderers). Some of them emigrated to northern Ireland before emigrating to the colonies.
You don't have to read the whole book, but the part about the Borderers shows some very persistent folkways from then to now.

Posted by Coralie on 11/21/2010 at 3:31 PM

Re: “The Tea Party Movement: Where American History wilts on the vine

Here are some quotes from various Founding Fathers about the separation of church and state, that I included in my book SWIMMING IN A SEA OF IDEOLOGY. Not the usual quotes you hear from Teapartiers:
John Adams, 2nd U.S. President in “A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America,” 1787-1788: Although the detail of the formation of the American governments is at present little known or regarded either in Europe or in America, it may hereafter become an object of curiosity. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; It will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.
...Thirteen governments thus founded on the natural authority of the people alone, without a pretence of miracle or mystery, and which are destined to spread over the northern part of that whole quarter of the globe, are a great point gained in favor of the rights of mankind.

Thomas Jefferson, 3rd U.S. President: The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods, or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.

James Madison, 4th U.S. President in Letter to Edward Livingston, 1822: Religion flourishes in greater purity without than with the aid of government.

James Madison, “Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments,” 1785: During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What have been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the Clergy, ignorance and servility in the laity; in both, superstition, bigotry and persecution.

Thomas Paine: Persecution is not an original feature in any religion; but it is always the strongly marked feature of all religions established by law.

Benjamin Franklin: When religion is good, I conceive it will support itself; and when it does not support itself, and God does not take care to support it so that its professors are obliged to call for the help of the civil power, it is a sign, I apprehend, of its being a bad one.

Luther Martin, “The Genuine Information XII,” Feb. 8, 1788: The part of the system, which provides that no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States, was adopted by a very great majority of the convention, and without much debate.

Reverend Isaac Backus, Baptist minister, Feb. 4, 1788: And let the history of all nations be searched, from that day to this, and it will appear that the imposing of religious tests hath been the greatest engine of tyranny in the world. And I rejoice to see so many gentlemen who are now giving in the rights of conscience, in this great and important matter.

Henry Abbot, Baptist clergyman, July 30, 1788: But it is objected, that the people of America may perhaps choose representatives who have no religion at all, and that Pagans and Mahometans may be admitted into offices. But how is it possible to exclude any set of men, without taking away that principle of religious freedom which we ourselves so warmly contended for? This is the foundation on which persecution has been raised in every part of the world.

Posted by Coralie on 06/21/2010 at 5:11 PM

 

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