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Planning my vacations for the next 2 years.

Posted by THE SYSTEM on November 20, 2017 at 11:04 AM

Recent Comments

Re: “Arkansas may violate ARRA caveat with dumbed down' residential rules

The new HUD Single-Family handbook 4000.1 states that meeting the 2009 IECC is a mandatory requirement for a FHA Federal mortgage insurance effective March 14, 2016 and USDA has announmced they will be following suit. The 2014 Arkansas Energy Code (2014 AEC) does not meet the 2009 IECC standard because duct testing is mandatory for the 2009 IECC but is optional under the 2014 Arkansas Energy Code. With no cost and no criteria for failure, almost all builders are choosing the visual inspection option. For FHA mortgage insurance, builders will be required to sign the HUD 92541 Builders Certifcation their house meets the 2009 IECC. If their ducts have not been tested, these builders will risk purgering themselves. If mortgage lenders don't opt for due deligence and require third-party code compliance verification from an Energy Rater or local code official, every FHA-insured mortgage will be a potential lawsuit. It gets worse. Most houses built to the 2014 AEC in Climate Zone 3 (most of Arkansas) could be shown to meet the 2009 IECC simply by being energy rated and passing a duct leakage and blower door test, but not in 12 counties in Climate Zone 4 in NW Arkansas. In these counties, the 2014 AEC actually reduced attic insulation and duct insulation in attics, emiminated slab insulation and changed windows requiremets to windows more suitable for Helena. The result is, even with the energy rating option that allows tradeoffs and the most flexibility, it will be virtually impossible to bring houses up to the 2009 IECC if built on a slap to the minimum 2014 Arkansas Energy Code.

Posted by doronron on 07/03/2016 at 3:53 PM

Re: “Arkansas may violate ARRA caveat with dumbed down' residential rules

The new HUD Single-Family handbook 4000.1 states that meeting the 2009 IECC is a mandatory requirement for a FHA Federal mortgage insurance effective March 14, 2016 and USDA has announmced they will be following suit. The 2014 Arkansas Energy Code (2014 AEC) does not meet the 2009 IECC standard because duct testing is mandatory for the 2009 IECC but is optional under the 2014 Arkansas Energy Code. With no cost and no criteria for failure, almost all builders are choosing the visual inspection option. For FHA mortgage insurance, builders will be required to sign the HUD 92541 Builders Certifcation their house meets the 2009 IECC. If their ducts have not been tested, these builders will risk purgering themselves. If mortgage lenders don't opt for due deligence and require third-party code compliance verification from an Energy Rater or local code official, every FHA-insured mortgage will be a potential lawsuit. It gets worse. Most houses built to the 2014 AEC in Climate Zone 3 (most of Arkansas) could be shown to meet the 2009 IECC simply by being energy rated and passing a duct leakage and blower door test, but not in 12 counties in Climate Zone 4 in NW Arkansas. In these counties, the 2014 AEC actually reduced attic insulation and duct insulation in attics, emiminated slab insulation and changed windows requiremets to windows more suitable for Helena. The result is, even with the energy rating option that allows tradeoffs and the most flexibility, it will be virtually impossible to bring houses up to the 2009 IECC if built on a slap to the minimum 2014 Arkansas Energy Code.

Posted by doronron on 07/03/2016 at 3:49 PM

 

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