Favorite

Football and race, fact and fiction 

book_notes1-1.jpg

September 14 brings the release of two much-anticipated books with Arkansas ties. "Carry the Rock: Race, Football and the Soul of an American City" (Rodale, hardcover, $25.99) by Little Rock reporter Jay Jennings (formerly a reporter with Sports Illustrated) weaves the story of Bernie Cox's last winning season coaching the Central High football team with a nuanced, meticulously researched history of racial tension in Little Rock. And acclaimed novelist Rick Bass' "Nashville Chrome" (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, hardcover, $24) offers a fictionalized account of Arkansas's first family of country, The Browns. The siblings Bonnie, Jim Ed and Maxine Brown, under the tutelage of Chet Atkins, achieved massive international success in the early '60s. Bass charts the band's rise, while looking back, through the eyes of a modern-day Maxine, as she dreams of returning to fame.

Looking ahead a little farther, John Grisham's umpteenth courtroom novel, "The Confession" (Doubleday, hardcover, $28.95), hits bookstores on Oct. 26. It's about a killer who finds unexpected resistance, when, late in life, he decides to confess a brutal crime for which another man is scheduled to be executed. In the meantime, there's always Grisham's first young adult novel, "Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer."

Even farther down the road: The follow-up to the story collection "The View from the Seventh Layer," by Little Rock novelist Kevin Brockmeier, has a release date. It's a novel called "The Illumination" (Pantheon, hardcover, $24.99). Here's a teaser: "What if our pain was the most beautiful thing about us? In the aftermath of a fatal car accident, a private journal of love notes written by a husband to his wife passes into the keeping of a hospital patient, and from there through the hands of five other suffering people, touching each of them uniquely."

Hendrix College announced its 2010-11 public events calendar last week. Its slate of authors, which last year included Art Spiegelman and Francine Prose, is equally impressive this year. Short short fiction master Lydia Davis is scheduled on Oct. 28 in what's billed as "An Evening of Humor with Lydia Davis." And wunderkind novelist and essayist Jonathan Safran Foer ("Everything Is Illuminated," "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close"), recently named one of the New Yorker's "20 under 40" novelists, comes to campus on Nov. 18 for a program called "Why Jews Laugh at Things That Aren't Funny."

Favorite

From the ArkTimes store

Tags:

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • The Tough Talkin' Tom Cotton Edition

    Tough talkin’ Tom Cotton, a major state Supreme Court decision and a pivotal lawsuit for Little Rock politics — on this week's podcast.
    • Jan 19, 2018
  • Can't miss CAMA

    Central Arkansas Music Awards on Jan. 23.
    • Jan 18, 2018
  • The full list of Central Arkansas Music Award nominees

    We've had several requests for this, so here is the complete list of nominees in the 22 categories judges considered for the inaugural Central Arkansas Music Awards just around the corner on Jan. 23 at CALS' Ron Robinson Theater.
    • Jan 17, 2018
  • More »

Most Shared

Latest in Books

Event Calendar

« »

January

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31  

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Can't miss CAMA

    • Start making cash right now... Get more time with your family by doing jobs that…

    • on January 20, 2018
  • Re: American Made' is as swift as Seal's hustle

    • LOAN OFFER. Hello are you in need of a loan to pay your debts or…

    • on January 18, 2018
 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation