Favorite

Green = green 

NEW LOOK: On Swaggerty Creek.
  • NEW LOOK: On Swaggerty Creek.

 

The urban stream reclamation project at Swaggerty Park didn’t need any help from the state Game and Fish Commission to make the creek come alive.

The project, which the city’s Parks and Recreation Department points to as an illustration of the open space philosophy, returned Swaggerty Creek, for 30 years trapped in a trapezoidal concrete ditch as part of a channelization project, to nature.

Just three months after the completion of the project, crayfish and seven different species of fish were swimming in the creek, Rob Fisher of Ecological Conservation Organization (ECO) said. ECO revamped a quarter-mile section of Swaggerty Creek as part of the Parks and Recreation Department’s refurbishing of the South End park. “I was actually shocked at how fast it kind of reclaimed itself,” Fisher said.

With a $99,000 grant from the U.S. National Parks Service Urban Parks Program, ECO removed more than 100 dump-truck loads of broken concrete and 7,800 cubic yards of soil, brought in rocks, trees and plants and returned the stream to a more natural, meandering track in 2006.

The result, Fisher said, is a more beautiful creek, and higher property values for neighboring homeowners.

“I really liked the Swaggerty Creek project,” Fisher said. “It’s an underprivileged neighborhood, and it was really one of the first of its kind in the nation … where a stream was reclaimed from what was a concrete ditch.”

ECO has since gotten a $25,000 grant to continue work at Swaggerty Creek. The National Fish and Wildlife money will buy native grass, wildflowers, shrubs and trees to plant; other funds will be tapped to place boulders in the stream. Equipment will be donated to the Thrasher Boys and Girls Club nearby.

Fisher is also developing a monthly outdoor education project in cooperation with the Boys and Girls Club that will include outings along the restored section of Swaggerty Creek. “We’re going to get some handheld water quality units that they can actually put in the water and read.”

For more information about ECO, go to their website at: ecoconservation.org.

project at Swaggerty Park didn’t need any help from the state Game and Fish Commission to make the creek come alive.

The project, which the city’s Parks and Recreation Department points to as an illustration of the open space philosophy, returned Swaggerty Creek, for 30 years trapped in a trapezoidal concrete ditch as part of a channelization project, to nature.

Just three months after the completion of the project, crayfish and seven different species of fish were swimming in the creek, Rob Fisher of Ecological Conservation Organization (ECO) said. ECO revamped a quarter-mile section of Swaggerty Creek as part of the Parks and Recreation Department’s refurbishing of the South End park. “I was actually shocked at how fast it kind of reclaimed itself,” Fisher said.

With a $99,000 grant from the U.S. National Parks Service Urban Parks Program, ECO removed more than 100 dump-truck loads of broken concrete and 7,800 cubic yards of soil, brought in rocks, trees and plants and returned the stream to a more natural, meandering track in 2006.

The result, Fisher said, is a more beautiful creek, and higher property values for neighboring homeowners.

“I really liked the Swaggerty Creek project,” Fisher said. “It’s an underprivileged neighborhood, and it was really one of the first of its kind in the nation … where a stream was reclaimed from what was a concrete ditch.”

ECO has since gotten a $25,000 grant to continue work at Swaggerty Creek. The National Fish and Wildlife money will buy native grass, wildflowers, shrubs and trees to plant; other funds will be tapped to place boulders in the stream. Equipment will be donated to the Thrasher Boys and Girls Club nearby.

Fisher is also developing a monthly outdoor education project in cooperation with the Boys and Girls Club that will include outings along the restored section of Swaggerty Creek. “We’re going to get some handheld water quality units that they can actually put in the water and read.”

For more information about ECO, go to their website at: ecoconservation.org.

Favorite

From the ArkTimes store

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

More by David Koon

Readers also liked…

  • Eligible voters removed from rolls

    Arkansas Times reporters contacted election officials around the state to see how they had handled flawed felon data from the secretary of state. Responses varied dramatically.
    • Aug 11, 2016
  • Real Republicans don't do pre-K

    Also, drifting away from trump, Hudson's downfall at ASU and more.
    • Aug 11, 2016
  • Asa on pre-K

    • Aug 17, 2016

Most Shared

  • So much for a school settlement in Pulaski County

    The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette's Cynthia Howell got the scoop on what appears to be coming upheaval in the Pulaski County School District along with the likely end of any chance of a speedy resolution of school desegregation issues in Pulaski County.
  • Riverfest calls it quits

    The board of directors of Riverfest, Arkansas's largest and longest running music festival, announced today that the festival will no longer be held. Riverfest celebrated its 40th anniversary in June. A press release blamed competition from other festivals and the rising cost of performers fees for the decision.
  • Football for UA Little Rock

    Andrew Rogerson, the new chancellor at UA Little Rock, has decided to study the cost of starting a major college football team on campus (plus a marching band). Technically, it would be a revival of football, dropped more than 60 years ago when the school was a junior college.
  • Turn to baseball

    When the world threatens to get you down, there is always baseball — an absorbing refuge, an alternate reality entirely unto itself.

Latest in Arkansas Reporter

Event Calendar

« »

July

S M T W T F S
  1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation