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Ground breakers 

In the 10th Drawing Invitational.

BIRD BOOK: Barbara Pierce's piece at Arts Center.
  • BIRD BOOK: Barbara Pierce's piece at Arts Center.

A book in which one is invited to write comments sits in the entry to the Arkansas Arts Center’s Wolfe Gallery, where the 10th Drawing Invitational is on exhibit. Great praise is recorded there, including one note that says “greatest stuff seen in a long time.”

And so it is. The works on paper (or with paper) by 13 contemporary American artists range from the photorealistic to the conceptual, and are a lesson in how today’s fine draftsmen are finding ways of making new art.

The ability to draw is nothing new, rare as it is. So to break new ground, several artists in the invitational — put together by curator Brian Young — have chosen to combine representation with offbeat uses of paper and materials. Barbara Ress (Silver Spring, Md.) draws dead birds and bird skeletons in a classical style and then precisely slices through the paper to create shadow and three-dimensionality. Marietta Hoferer (New York) makes lines with fine strips of strapping tape in geometric snowflake patterns. Oriane Stender (Brooklyn) weaves tiny strips of dollar bills into square mats and other forms, and stitches thread through stamps.

Karen Moss (Brookline, Mass.) draws on multiple sheets of paper, creating images that unravel and change form. Astrid Bowlby (Philadelphia) makes thousands of tiny pencil marks; some suggest the organic, others a kind of internal logic of mark-making.

Many of those commenting in the Arts Center’s book, not surprisingly, praised the work of Minnesota artist Skip Steinworth, the traditionalist in the exhibit. His large graphite still lifes are soft, realistic, but exist in flat space. Nicola Lopez (New York) allows herself expression, drawing a whirl of objects in flowing and splattering lines that show her to be a reincarnated Marcel Duchamp whose works have content.

Art is alive in these fresh images. But don’t take this The drawing invitational runs through December.



Eureka Springs is having its Fall Art Fair and Sculpture Show from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Best Western Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center, 207 W. Van Buren. The juried show includes the works of 70 artists, including Zeek Taylor, Julie Kahn Valentine, Mark Rademacher, Hank Kaminsky, Nancy Baptiste and others. See www.eurekaspringsartists.com for full list of artists.



An art show to benefit the mission of the Arkansas Community Arts Cooperative will be held Nov. 26-27 at 301 Main St. in North Little Rock.

The 4th annual ACAC exhibit opens with a reception Friday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; food, drink and live music are planned. The show continues noon to 6 p.m. Saturday. More than 40 area artists will be represented, including veteran two- and three-dimensional artists Hamid Ebrahamifar, Ila Hallmark, Kevin Kresse, John Kushmaul, Dominique Simmons and photographers Eric Freeman and Dero Sanders.

The ACAC is raising funds to buy exhibit and studio space for artists and musicians.








The ability to draw is nothing new, rare as it is. So to break new ground, several artists in the invitational — put together by curator Brian Young — have chosen to combine representation with offbeat uses of paper and materials. Barbara Ress (Silver Spring, Md.) draws dead birds and bird skeletons in a classical style and then precisely slices through the paper to create shadow and three-dimensionality. Marietta Hoferer (New York) makes lines with fine strips of strapping tape in geometric snowflake patterns. Oriane Stender (Brooklyn) weaves tiny strips of dollar bills into square mats and other forms, and stitches thread through stamps.

Karen Moss (Brookline, Mass.) draws on multiple sheets of paper, creating images that unravel and change form. Astrid Bowlby (Philadelphia) makes thousands of tiny pencil marks; some suggest the organic, others a kind of internal logic of mark-making.

Many of those commenting in the Arts Center’s book, not surprisingly, praised the work of Minnesota artist Skip Steinworth, the traditionalist in the exhibit. His large graphite still lifes are soft, realistic, but exist in flat space. Nicola Lopez (New York) allows herself expression, drawing a whirl of objects in flowing and splattering lines that show her to be a reincarnated Marcel Duchamp whose works have content.

Art is alive in these fresh images. But don’t take this The drawing invitational runs through December.



Eureka Springs is having its Fall Art Fair and Sculpture Show from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Best Western Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center, 207 W. Van Buren. The juried show includes the works of 70 artists, including Zeek Taylor, Julie Kahn Valentine, Mark Rademacher, Hank Kaminsky, Nancy Baptiste and others. See www.eurekaspringsartists.com for full list of artists.



An art show to benefit the mission of the Arkansas Community Arts Cooperative will be held Nov. 26-27 at 301 Main St. in North Little Rock.

The 4th annual ACAC exhibit opens with a reception Friday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; food, drink and live music are planned. The show continues noon to 6 p.m. Saturday. More than 40 area artists will be represented, including veteran two- and three-dimensional artists Hamid Ebrahamifar, Ila Hallmark, Kevin Kresse, John Kushmaul, Dominique Simmons and photographers Eric Freeman and Dero Sanders.

The ACAC is raising funds to buy exhibit and studio space for artists and musicians.






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