Guns killed people 

Guns killed people

This afternoon, I thought of writing a letter pointing out that every gunman responsible for his share of the last month's carnage, had the legal right to own a gun. The officers killed in Pittsburgh? Their shooter was a registered gun owner. The eight killed at a nursing home in North Carolina, he owned his gun legally. The family of five killed in Washington, the 10 in Alabama, the shooters were all signed off as responsible citizens with full rights to their firearm.

But we've all heard the comebacks: guns don't kill people, people do. If someone set someone else on fire with gasoline, do you outlaw gasoline? I thought, yah, enough of that debate. It never goes anywhere.

However, in hours while I sat drumming my fingers in contemplation, a gunman opened fire at a church camp in California, killing one and wounding four, and Alabama man shot and killed himself and his family of five, just days before his divorce hearing. And minutes later, as if not to be outdone, a Florida woman at a shooting range shot her son at close range, then turned the gun on herself. Yes, that last one is on video, calling to mind the latest of M. Night Shyamalan's really bad movies.

Each of these massacres actually creates more support for guns in the home, guns in the glove compartment, guns in the teacher's desk. The idea is that if only one of those convalescent hospital employees or immigration center teachers had thought to bring their AK-47 to work with them, then the crazy shooter would have been dead after a round or two.

Which raises the question: Who are the crazy shooters? Well, those other people. Not the good gun owners. The crazy shooters are those that have trouble controlling their impulses, who wake up feeling that they have nothing to live for, who come home from work in a rage, and decide to make others as miserable as they are. You know, those misfits have a fight with their boss and wish they could do something about it once and for all.

Funny thing. I feel that way about twice a week. When that happens, I reach for my … video games, punching bag, gym membership card. No guns. I'm one of those increasingly rare people who realize that access to a firearm can only lead to trouble.

Jerome Heyes

From the Internet


Your correction in the April 9 edition of the Arkansas Times “The Insider” re Wright firm/ Friday firm/judicial candidate Chip Welch was misleading and I continue to have people ask me about it.

I ran for president of the Arkansas Bar Association several years ago against Phil Kaplan and Charlie Owen. Lawyers in the state wrote letters on behalf of each of the candidates. Chip wrote a letter endorsing Phil Kaplan. It made no negative reference to me or my firm. There were certainly no hard feelings about the letter. I consider Chip to be a competent lawyer and a friend. I do not want anyone to think that this firm has a grudge against Chip because of that letter or for any other reason.

Fred Ursery

Friday, Eldredge & Clark

Little Rock

Lincoln's betrayal

How apropos that during this Easter season, as we remember the betrayal of Jesus by his servant, we read of Blanche Lincoln, the public servant, and her continuing betrayal of the citizens of this state.

Of course, this is the same senator who rushed to approve making federal bankruptcy laws harder for Arkansan's whose medical bills and debt to predatory creditors might have made the super-rich not as rich.

Of course, Lincoln wanted to make sure the insurance industry made their billions from the Medicare supplemental program, rather than allowing senior citizens the opportunity to obtain prescription drugs at the same costs as would be available under the Medicare program.

Of course, she supported the Great White Bush at almost every turn during his lawless reign and blatant disregard for the Constitution, our federal laws and every fiber of just decent human behavior — did she really think that true Christians would think Christ would approve torture?

And to make sure she continues to represent the powerful money interests, they have lined her re-election efforts with the equivalency of 30 pieces of silver.

Whatever did the good citizens of this state do to cause the likes of Lincoln and Pryor to ascend to office?

Rev. J. Cooper




From the ArkTimes store


Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Arkansas Times Staff

Readers also liked…

  • Outsourcing state government

    As a citizen, I don't get to choose not to pay taxes because I don't like what the Arkansas state government is spending state and federal money on, such as paying a Chinese company, Sun Paper, approximately $1 billion to build a paper mill in Clark County.
    • Sep 22, 2016
  • Radical Zinn

    Re: the bill to remove Howard Zinn books from school libraries: When "alternative" books are removed from school libraries and class curriculums, it is the beginning of broader suppression of education and civilian participation in politics, not the end of it.
    • Mar 9, 2017
  • On Walmart and state money

    No they don't need state help. Any conservative legislator who is true to their tea party principles will crow on about crony capitalism. I look forward to deafening silence.
    • Sep 21, 2017

Most Shared

Latest in Letters

  • One-size-fits-all FMLA is unrealistic

    Five years ago, I worked at a bank to put myself through college. I was simultaneously caring for my terminally ill father. He was diagnosed my freshman year, and he nearly survived up to his goal: to see me graduate.
    • Mar 15, 2018
  • Pass red flag laws

    As a parent and teacher, I write to argue against President Trump's assertion, implicitly supported by Governor Hutchinson, that arming teachers would improve safety in our schools. Following the tragedy in Parkland, American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association oppose allowing nonsafety personnel to carry guns in schools.
    • Mar 8, 2018
  • Some thoughts on school shootings

    Arm teachers and other school employees? Bad idea. They have more than enough to do as it is.
    • Mar 1, 2018
  • More »

Event Calendar

« »


  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Most Viewed

  • The Griffin

    El Dorado's new restaurant showplace is worth the drive.
  • Best restaurants of Arkansas 2018

    It's a tough business, the restaurant industry. Over the 37 years that the Arkansas Times has asked its readers to tell us which restaurants and bakeries, chefs and bartenders, hamburgers and home cookin' and such are the best, even the favorites have come and gone.
  • House and Senate pass legislation to rein in pharmacy benefit managers

    On Wednesday, both chambers of the Arkansas legislature approved identical versions of a bill to regulate pharmacy benefit managers, the powerful health care companies at the center of a dispute over cuts in reimbursements paid to pharmacists.
  • The post-prison license hurdle

    Arkansas is trying to make it easier for those released from ADC to get licenses and IDs. But challenges remain.
  • Big on Petit & Keet

    Readers give it several awards; Keet credits the loyal staff.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Cowboy ropes ’em in

    • If you were in my shoes am really pretty sure you will surely need a…

    • on March 19, 2018
  • Re: The post-prison license hurdle

    • The acc re entry program was a blessing for me aswell. I wss at the…

    • on March 19, 2018
  • Re: Growers and $$

    • It costs between 5 and 7 million dollars to get into the medical marijuana growing…

    • on March 19, 2018

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation