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Hillary hit jobs 

It's always been my conviction that if Hillary Clinton could be appointed president, she'd do a bang-up job. Getting elected, however, might prove more difficult.

It's always been my conviction that if Hillary Clinton could be appointed president, she'd do a bang-up job. Getting elected, however, might prove more difficult. Michelle Goldberg does an excellent job defining the problem in a Slate article about why so many people say they hate her.

"There's a reason actors do screen tests," Goldberg writes. "Not everyone's charm translates to film and video. For as long as Hillary Clinton has been in public life, people who've met in her person have marveled at how much more likable she is in the flesh than she is on television."

As a friendly acquaintance since 1980, I'd second that. My wife, who worked with her on the board of Arkansas Children's Hospital, will hear nothing against her. We recently read a Facebook posting from a friend in Eureka Springs. Neither a bigshot nor a political activist, Crescent was profoundly touched that after her husband died in a bicycle crash, one of her first callers was New York's newly elected senator. Hillary had left Arkansas for good, but not its people.

But no, her personal warmth doesn't always come across on TV. She's anything but a natural actress. However, like most pundits, Goldberg glosses over the issue that's plagued Hillary since Bill Clinton's first term: the unrelenting hostility of Washington's courtier press.

People say they don't trust the media, and then they credit the imaginary scandals this cohort has peddled for 25 years. The exact causes of Clinton-hatred among the press clique remain obscure. Was it Bill Clinton's humble Arkansas origins? Humbling the Bush family? Failing to pay homage to society hostess Sally Quinn? Nobody knows.

Todd S. Purdum has recently offered a classic in the genre: a compulsively disingenuous Politico piece entitled "Why Can't Hillary Stop Fudging the Truth?" It begins by describing a "brief, but revelatory" exchange between Clinton and Charlie Rose.

Asked about her damn emails, Hillary tried to broaden Rose's focus.

"Well, I would hope that you like many others would also look at what he said when he testified before Congress," she said, "because when he did, he clarified much of what he had said in his press conference."

If you're like most Americans, you don't know that when Comey testified, he was forced to walk back his assertion that the FBI found three (out of 30,000) documents marked "classified" among her emails.

Were they properly marked? Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.) asked.

"No," Comey answered.

So wouldn't the absence of such markings "tell her immediately that those three documents were not classified?"

"That would be a reasonable inference," Comey said.

In other words, contrary to the FBI director's grandstanding press conference and a million Republicans chanting, "Hillary lied," there were zero documents marked classified on her server. Not one.

So was Comey dissembling during his press conference? Or had he made an honest error? Pundits like Purdum know better than to ask. He never acknowledged Comey's walk-back. No, the real issue was Hillary's "sloppiness," and her forgetting Comey used that exact word.

"The pattern is unmistakable," Purdum scolded "from the Whitewater inquiry (when she resisted disclosing documents about a failed Arkansas land deal) ... to the Rose Law Firm billing records (which infamously and mysteriously turned up in the White House residence after she'd said they were missing) to the Monica Lewinsky affair and the State Department emails themselves."

A more misleading paragraph would be hard to imagine. In fact, the Clintons voluntarily delivered Whitewater documents to the independent counsel, but not to New York Times reporters whose inept, downright deceptive reporting created the bogus "scandal."

If there had to be an investigation, they wanted a real one.

Also no, the famous billing records didn't turn up in the White House residence, "mysteriously" or otherwise. An aide found them in a box under her desk in the Old Executive Office Building, where she'd misplaced them. (They were Xerox copies, incidentally. Hence no motive for hiding them existed.)

Once found, of course, they vindicated Hillary's sworn testimony. See Joe Conason's and my book "The Hunting of the President" for details.

As to the "Monica Lewinsky affair," is there anybody in America that doesn't know Bill Clinton played slap and tickle with a young thing at the office and lied about it?

How is that his wife's fault?

Anyone who's followed Hillary Clinton's political career has seen this happen time and again. Ballyhooed charges of wrongdoing and/or perjury that collapse in the light of evidence, only to have newly imagined allegations follow almost at once.

Can you say Benghazi?

Some years ago, I got to ask the late televangelist Jerry Falwell on camera which of the Ten Commandments was the worse sin, adultery or false witness? Falwell had peddled the "Clinton Chronicles," hysterical videos charging the president with drug smuggling and murder.

To his credit, Falwell said they were equally bad.

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