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The idea of a “wedding gift registry” for someone who has been married since 1974 is in very poor taste. Janet Huckabee’s friends who dreamed this up need to reconsider. The governor and first lady need to call a halt to such a ridiculous scheme. It is all in very bad taste. Surely they could leave the Governor’s Mansion with a bit of dignity.

Brenda Ball Tirrell

Hot Springs Village

Sympathy for workers’ families

Re: The Nov. 2 article by Warwick Sabin about the death of sawmill worker Jeremy Foster: My heart really goes out to his parents, Jeremy Foster and Vicki Ellison, who have just begun to feel the pain of how easy it has become for corporate greed to snap away a young life without so much as a slap on the hand.

Can the world fathom what it’s like to survive this kind of unbearably painful traumatic loss? Only to find that across the globe everyday this has become the norm? Not only have they lost their son but they have also lost the ability to heal. Every time there is a story in the news of yet another preventable accident resulting in a worker’s death wounds will be reopened over and over again. And if the rest of the world never comes to realize the overwhelming need for justice those wounds will remain open. My heart is overflowing with pain, compassion and a very real understanding of how hard the road ahead will be for these families because they have now become part of the only chance we have at all to prevent corporations like Deltic from walking away from negligent homicide. And, God willing, one day prevent a life from being lost.

Mary Vivenzi

United Support & Memorial
for Workplace Fatalities

Good men

The full page ad from “The Peoples Judicial Review Board” appearing in your Nov. 9 edition libels two good men. I assume that is why the people who paid for this notice lacked the courage to sign their names to it.

Donald S. Ryan

Little Rock

The election

In 2000, when George W. Bush was “selected” president and the Republican Party enjoyed a clean sweep in both houses of Congress, I stated that when things get bad enough, the pendulum will swing back. Well, it took six years of arrogance, deceitfulness, corruption and incompetence, but a clear majority of American voters finally decided that too much was enough. It’s about time.

William Black

Mount Ida

Botched lines

Sen. John Kerry botched his lines. In what was intended to be a jab at the president’s stupidity for getting us into the Iraq war came out as an insult to the men and women serving over there. The president, vice president and press secretary repeated the statement as if he intended to insult our troops. Even the old Nixon pursuer Daniel Schorr came down on the senator in a couple of his commentaries on National Public Radio.

If speaking your lines correctly is a requirement for a president, why did we elect the one we’ve got?

Jerry Shell

Leslie

Term limits

Imagine you are a small business owner or supervisor. You call an employee in for an evaluation and tell them, “You’re doing a great job, but you’ve been here six months. We have to let you go.”

What business owner in their right mind would pursue such a policy? If the position entailed any kind of purchasing activity, wouldn’t that tend to make new hires even more susceptible to the wiles of salespeople, vendors and contractors, who are really just another form of lobbyist? Wouldn’t that constant turnover deprive the company of an institutional memory, the sense of “how we do things efficiently around here”?

A similar insanity is forced upon Arkansas voters by our draconian term limits. While I am not advocating a return to the bad ol’ days of Nick Wilson, I do support a substantial revision of our current statute, which forces House members out after three terms, and Senate members out after two. If people have a desire to serve, let them serve! Any business owner would do the same with a valued employee. Altering or removing term limits would encourage more people to seek public service, resulting in fewer uncontested elections, a livelier public debate and a stronger democracy. A revolving door legislature serves only the interests of lobbyists.

It’s been said that the only thing necessary for evil men to triumph is that good men do nothing. Or kick the good ones out before they can accomplish much.

Mark W. Riley

De Queen

Unsung heroes

While politicians and media are busy congratulating themselves and each other for this historic election, and with humble respect to the many patriots who served and sacrificed for our country, I’d like to point out some unsung heroes. This month we witnessed an election in which the American people took back their government. Those election results were, in part, made possible by thousands of volunteers and letter-writers across the country.

Ignoring indifference and scorn from family and neighbors, those volunteers and letter-writers, in their own ways, soldiered on. Their intent was to make American a better country. It doesn’t matter on which side of the issues they stood; what matters is that they stood up for what they believed. Theirs were the drops of rain that became a mighty torrent. And this historic election is their legacy to future generations of Americans.

So these volunteers and letter-writers have reminded the politicians and media, in the words of the late Woody Guthrie, “This land is your land, this land is my land …” And perhaps the politicians and media will remember who really owns the joint, at least for a little while.

Creigh Shank

Little Rock

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