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Jesus and politics 

Jesus and politics

I'm not claiming Jesus would be a Democrat if he lived in present-day America, but would he support the GOP? Let's see. He was a radical peacenik. Which party is more supportive of war? Jesus healed the sick for free. Which party is opposed to universal health care? His followers held everything in common. Which party promotes private property? He fed people and didn't ask for payment. Which party is less supportive of public food assistance? Jesus said, "Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's; and to God the things that are God's." Which party hates taxes? He said, "It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God." Which party is more supportive of the wealthy? Jesus taught radical forgiveness. Which party most strongly opposes the death penalty? Jesus told The Parable of the Good Samaritan, a tale that promotes showing love for foreigners. Which party is anti-immigrant? Just some things to consider.

R.L. Hutson

Cabot

Apportionment amendment

This country was built off the revolutionary ideas of the Founding Fathers. The original Congress quickly came out and realized the Constitution needed amending. They passed 12 amendments, 10 moving on to be the Bill of Rights, and one ratified in 1992, becoming the 27th Amendment. One was forgotten about, the first proposed amendment, the Congressional Apportionment Amendment, which has been ratified by 11 states.

The Congressional Apportionment Amendment, known originally as Article the First, places a cap on the number of constituents a U.S. representative can represent to 50,000 people. This would drastically change politics in this country.

Arkansas currently has four representatives; if the CAA were to be ratified, Arkansas would have 60 representatives. This would help better represent Arkansas politically, because we know that not all Arkansans are conservative, and they deserve representation in the U.S. Congress, too. Arkansas could be the first state in over 225 years to ratify this amendment, follow in the Founding Fathers' footsteps and support democracy.

Tucker Iacobacci

Hot Springs

Whoa!

Can it be that our president consorted with convicted felons?

Can it be that each of these (five in all) represents a link in a chain that connects our president to a legitimate charge of "unindicted co-conspirator?"

Can it be that this "chain gang" started with Trump's presidential campaign and will end up in a federal penitentiary?

I've always believed that you can judge a person by the company they keep.

This appraisal is fair. Convincing. Honest. I'm not perfect, but in my world evil stands alone.

Truth Trumps T-Rump! This is our country's "password" to survival.

Harry Herget Little Rock

From the web

In response to the Aug. 26 Arkansas Blog post "More data on Asa Hutchinson's tax cut for the rich":

Just further evidence that the suffering of the uninsured will be extended by giving them membership in the group of overtaxed. The participation of the higher income level will be reduced.

Going for the record

This is nothing more than reverse Robin Hood — take from the poor and middle class and give to the rich. You can't put enough lipstick on this travesty to even call it a pig.

Sound Policy

Asa's Kansas plan for our state! It will 100 percent for sure result in the kind of ruin we've witnessed in [Gov. Sam] Brownback's Kansas. By the time that happens, Asa will be living in luxury behind a gate in some other state. What, Asa worry? You know the poor ought to be the ones fighting tooth and nail for another penny. Instead it's the mega-rich that are more than willing to ruin a state or a country just to add another million to their gigantic pile of millions? We have a bald, fat, orange-colored president aiming to be America's first trillionaire even if there's no country left when he's done. Like Asa, Trump will be living in luxury behind a gate in Russia when he reaches that goal.

I don't hate rich people, but, by god, they need to rein in their greed!

DeathbyInches

This illustrates again the basic economic differences between Democrats and Republicans when it comes to economic policies.

1) The GOP believes the best way for government to assist the capitalist economy is for massive government aid to be put in at the top. Pour the government money into corporations, financial centers and industries and get them on their feet and the benefits, make the rich richer and the benefits will trickle down to the masses with increased hiring, etc.

2) Democrats believe in pouring government funds in at the bottom; programs for the unemployed, government work projects, get money into the hands of the workers, etc., and the benefits will percolate to the top as people get money to purchase manufactured goods, industries will start humming, production increases as demands for products increase.

Both have the same pump-priming goal, but it's trickle-down economics vs. percolating economics. Both sides are capitalists and both sides want to defend, promote and protect capitalism, even if with government funds. Thus we have the Bush administration using billions of government funds to bail out Wall Street in 2008 and the Obama administration doing the same with the American automobile industry in 2009. Both were unabashed in such use of taxpayer's funds. Cato1

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