Favorite

Paula Anderson: Pulmonologist 

Helping adults with CF

click to enlarge PULMONOLOGIST: Paula Anderson.
  • PULMONOLOGIST: Paula Anderson.

If Paula Anderson had more time and energy to devote to something other than practicing medicine, she'd work to get insurance coverage for a particular group of her patients: adults with cystic fibrosis.

That combination — adults and cystic fibrosis — used to be an oxymoron. Today, however, more children with the debilitating lung disease are surviving into adulthood. But because they have CF, they may have trouble getting health insurance.

“It's heartbreaking to see someone not do better because they can't afford their meds,” said Anderson, a pulmonologist with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

CF patients today live to a median age of 38 — which means half are younger and half are older. Anderson has a patient in her 60s. In the early 1990s, doctors at Children's Hospital who treat CF asked UAMS to begin a clinic for their patients who survived into adulthood. Anderson and another physician at UAMS (one that left soon after making the commitment, she notes wryly) agreed. Today, she has 80 CF patients; the severity of their disease varies widely. It's a disease that affects multiple organs — liver, pancreas, the reproductive tract. Anderson's weapons in the fight against the disease include inhalers that work to clear the mucus in the lungs, antibiotic inhalers, special enzymes to overcome nutrient deficiencies.

Anderson, who's been on the UAMS faculty since 1989, teaches and sees patients with all kinds of lung disease. Hers is a specialty that requires the ability to deal with death. Talking to families about end-of-life decisions “is a big part of what we do”; dealing with the families of the dying is something that medical schools should spend more time teaching their students, she said.

The greater availability of palliative care services today and hospice have lent more dignity and control to dying than in years past. But families need to make their end-of-life desires known “before it becomes a big issue,” she said.

 “Sometimes, there's a very clear directive from patients” about whether they want to be ventilated or allowed to die, “and that's wonderful,” Anderson said. “And that would be the minority.” Doctors and other health professionals “are guilty of not bringing the issue up early enough” as well, she added.

How could she free up some time to work on CF issues? If people would quit smoking.

Like all pulmonologists, Anderson is passionate about the need to get people to put down the smokes. Smoking is the single cause of COPD, the heart-lung disease that kills 1,200 Arkansans every year; the disease would disappear if people quit smoking. “Smoking cessation is more important than all the drugs in the world,” Anderson said.

The Little Rock native is a graduate of Hendrix College and UAMS and did a fellowship in respiratory biology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and pulmonary and critical care medicine at UAMS. She is a member of the board of directors of the American College of Chest Physicians' Chest Foundation and was a member of the national Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Center Committee.

 

Favorite

Sign up for the Daily Update email

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Leslie Newell Peacock

  • "Delta Exhibition" winners announced

    The Arkansas Arts Center announced the winners of its 60th annual "Delta Exhibition" last night: A slideshow.
    • May 25, 2018
  • Philip Mann to leave symphony after 2018-19 season

    The Arkansas Symphony Orchestra announced in a press release today that the next season of the symphony will be Maestro Philip Mann's last. The ASO will give Mann the title of "Music Director Laureate" and hopes that "Mann will be able to continue his highly successful relationship with the ASO as he grows his international conducting presence and broadens his role within classical music."
    • May 24, 2018
  • 'The Beyond,' works by O'Keeffe and others, to open at Crystal Bridges

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art goes above and into "The Beyond" with an exhibition of 36 works by Georgia O'Keeffe spanning her career and works by contemporary artists whose sensibilities hearken to O'Keeffe's. The show opens Saturday, May 26.
    • May 24, 2018
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Latest in Cover Stories

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Pushing back in Harrison

    • It is disgusting to me that so many in this community profess to be such…

    • on May 25, 2018
  • Re: RiverFest 2018 preview

  • Re: Civics

    • Which amendment is it that allows maniacs to have cartoons!

    • on May 24, 2018
 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation