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Photos, paintings, beads and aprons 

Friday night will a busy one for gallery goers.

click to enlarge AT HAM: Laura Terry's abstracted landscapes.
  • AT HAM: Laura Terry's abstracted landscapes.
Friday night is so jam-packed with art events that it's hard to know where to start.

How about from east to west, starting with with 2nd Friday Art Night? A venue added just last month to the downtown gallery tour from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. will include both an auction of aprons along with its lineup of artists and craftspeople; and two professors, one from Hendrix College and the other from the University of Arkansas, are showing work at River Market district galleries.

The newish venue is the Village Commons, in the Bernice Garden at 14th and Main streets (or the building next door in case of rain). There, models will show off aprons made of vintage fabrics that will be sold to benefit Literacy Action of Central Arkansas. There will also be felted items by Tara Fletcher Gibbs, photographs by Aldo Fonticiella, art boxes by Lugene Woods, paintings by Nathaniel Dailey and Melverue Abraham, beads by Oshara and purses and jewelry by Justin Bowles. There will be a raffle for tickets to Wildwood Park for the Arts performances.

Hendrix art professor Maxine Payne has a photo installation based on her book of the same name, "Making Pictures: Three for a Dime," at the Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave. The installation tells the story of an Arkansas couple that traveled the state from 1937 to 1941 with a camera of their own making and sold photographs three for a dime. Also at ASI, the Arkansas League of Artists holds its first juried show, work selected by Townsend Wolfe.

The Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third, opens the exhibit "Natural Wonders: Paintings and Drawings by Laura Terry," abstracted Southern landscapes, and there will be live music as well. Terry is an assistant professor in the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the UA.

At Canvascommunity Gallery, Colleen Nick, whose daughter Morgan was abducted 15 years ago, will speak in conjunction with the exhibit "Portraits of Hope," photos of missing children and age-progressed images, at 6:30 p.m. Canvascommunity is at 1111 W. 7th St. The exhibit runs through September.

Heading west: Boswell-Mourot Fine Art at 5815 Kavanaugh Blvd. in the Heights will host a reception from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. for its new installation of work by Tonya McNair (mixed media on canvas), Kyle Boswell (glass and metal) and Eric Freeman (work on paper and panel). Cantrell Gallery at 8206 Cantrell Road opens "L'esprit de la Fleurs and the People I Have Known," paint on tarpaper by Rhonda Hicks and ceramics by Sarah Noebels; reception is 6-8 p.m.

The Boswell-Mourot show runs through the month; "L'esprit" runs through Oct. 30.

We got word about a three art openings in Hot Springs last week too late to publish in the paper: Katherine Strause is showing new paintings at Artchurch Studio, 301 Whittington Ave. The Museum of Contemporary Art has opened a show of abstract paintings by California artist Hessam Abrishami. MOCA is also showing photographs by Mark Story, "Living in Three Centuries: The Face of Age." At the Gallery@404B, Kat Ryals of Little Rock and Thomas Petillo of Nashville are showing photographs.

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