Favorite

Play ball, bro 

A gifted rookie outfielder for the Washington Nationals is causing a stir both on the field and in the press conferences. A reporter asked a question about drinking beer after the game, and Bryce Harper replied, "That's a clown question, bro." Soon the quote was everywhere. Within a day or two, U.S. Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the majority leader of the Senate, answered a reporter with the same words that Harper had used. (For whatever it's worth, Harper is from Nevada too, and is a Mormon like Reid.)

Clown in this sense means "dumb," I think, and "bro" is short for "brother." We heard a similar comment during a ballgame last year. When a fan who'd run onto the field was pursued by a security guard, he pleaded, "Don't tase me, bro." That also was widely circulated.

I've just discovered that the St. Louis Cardinals have a pitcher with two z's in his name — Mark Rzepczynski. Quite a number of players have spelled their names with one z, like Al Zarilla and Gus Zernial, and, these days, a couple of dozen Rodriguezes, but a double-dipper is unusual if not unprecedented. (We're talking about surnames, understand. Dizzy Dean and Dazzy Vance don't count.) A famous home run hitter of the 1930s, Jimmy Foxx, was given the nickname "Double X." I hope the Cardinals will start calling their pitcher "Double Z," now that I've got the ball rolling. I'll be available to accept the first bobblehead doll on Double Z night.

"We acknowledge that this left Little in an unfortunate catch-22 — if he stayed, the officers would ultimately discover the car; if he attempted to leave in the car, he would lead the officers to it ... " A reader asks, "Should 'Catch-22' be capitalized, or has it gone into the language as a descriptive concept?" Capitalize, by all means. We don't want anyone to forget that it's the title of a great novel by Joseph Heller, published in 1961. It means "a problematic situation for which the only solution is denied by a circumstance inherent in the problem or by a rule." I read someplace that the title was going to be "Catch 18" until another novel, called "Mila 18," was published first.

Favorite

From the ArkTimes store

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Doug Smith

  • The L word and the C word

    I was excited to see the newspaper headline "Bielema liberal." "After all those neo-Nazis, we've finally got a coach who thinks right," I told friends. "I wonder if he belongs to the ADA."
    • May 1, 2014
  • Who's exasperated?

    Jim Newell was gripped by exasperation himself after reading this item in the business section. "Exacerbated" is the word the writer wanted, he sagely suggests.
    • Apr 24, 2014
  • We will run no race before it's ripe

    "What year would Oaklawn recognize as its 100th anniversary? After all, Oaklawn's advertising material is ripe with 'Since 1904,' but it's widely reported the first race wasn't run until 1905."
    • Apr 17, 2014
  • More »

Most Shared

  • In the margins

    A rediscovered violin concerto brings an oft-forgotten composer into the limelight.
  • Donald Trump is historically unpopular — and not necessarily where you think

    My colleagues John Ray and Jesse Bacon and I estimate, in the first analysis of its kind for the 2018 election season, that the president's waning popularity isn't limited to coastal cities and states. The erosion of his electoral coalition has spread to The Natural State, extending far beyond the college towns and urban centers that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. From El Dorado to Sherwood, Fayetteville to Hot Springs, the president's approval rating is waning.
  • Arkansans join House vote to gut Americans with Disabilities Act

    Despite fierce protests from disabled people, the U.S. House voted today, mostly on party lines, to make it harder to sue businesses for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. Of course Arkansas congressmen were on the wrong side.

Latest in Words

  • The L word and the C word

    I was excited to see the newspaper headline "Bielema liberal." "After all those neo-Nazis, we've finally got a coach who thinks right," I told friends. "I wonder if he belongs to the ADA."
    • May 1, 2014
  • Who's exasperated?

    Jim Newell was gripped by exasperation himself after reading this item in the business section. "Exacerbated" is the word the writer wanted, he sagely suggests.
    • Apr 24, 2014
  • We will run no race before it's ripe

    "What year would Oaklawn recognize as its 100th anniversary? After all, Oaklawn's advertising material is ripe with 'Since 1904,' but it's widely reported the first race wasn't run until 1905."
    • Apr 17, 2014
  • More »

Event Calendar

« »

February

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28  

Most Viewed

  • Donald Trump is historically unpopular — and not necessarily where you think

    My colleagues John Ray and Jesse Bacon and I estimate, in the first analysis of its kind for the 2018 election season, that the president's waning popularity isn't limited to coastal cities and states. The erosion of his electoral coalition has spread to The Natural State, extending far beyond the college towns and urban centers that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. From El Dorado to Sherwood, Fayetteville to Hot Springs, the president's approval rating is waning.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Out of control

    • And Olphart - hey, That is a witty reply - good for you!

    • on February 17, 2018
  • Re: Out of control

    • Oh for god's sake - read the play - just read the play before going…

    • on February 16, 2018
  • Re: Out of control

    • Aloysius, Not even a large man with a bodyguard detail acting in a way intended…

    • on February 16, 2018
 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation