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Sex offender levels 

The following are the descriptions of sex offender levels, as taken from the Arkansas State Sex Offender Protocol Training Manual.

LEVEL 1: Typically offenders in this category have no prior history of sexual offending and the community can be protected with notification inside the home and to local law enforcement authorities. LEVEL 2: Typically offenders in this category have a history of sexual offending where notification inside the home is insufficient. Community notification requires notice to the offender's known victim preference and those likely to come into contact with the offender.

LEVEL 3: Typically offenders in this category have a history of repeat sexual offending, and/or strong antisocial, violent or predatory personality characteristics. These are individuals whose offense and criminal history require notification throughout the community. Offenders who appear for the assessment under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs or who fail to timely disclose the use of medications, individuals who fail to appear for any phase of the assessment, individuals who are aggressive, threatening, or disruptive to the point that SOSRA staff cannot proceed with the assessment process, and individuals who voluntarily terminate the assessment process having been advised of the potential consequences will be classified as being a Level 3 or referred to SOAC for Sexually Violent Predator status. LEVEL 4: Sexually Violent Predator refers to a person who has been adjudicated guilty of a sex offense or acquitted on the grounds of mental disease or defect of a sex offense that makes the person likely to engage in predatory sex offenses. The designation indicates that the highest and most visible means of community notification is required.

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