Favorite

Tax talk one-sided in Arkansas 

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette churned up a little weekend enterprise reporting by assessing the possibility of tax cut proposals in the 2012 session of the legislature.

The even-year meeting is the second installment of the fiscal sessions directed by voters by constitutional amendment in 2008. It's supposed to be a quick budget review, not a time for serious new initiatives.

The pitch of the story, however, gives you some idea how successful the Republicans, have been in selling the press and public on the Tea Party narrative. That is, government spending is too great and taxes too high. There is no other story line to consider.

It passes for sober leadership now when a comparatively old guard Arkansas Republican, such as Rep. Davy Carter, expresses a reluctance to discuss tax cuts in 2012. But others, such as Eddie Joe Williams of Cabot and Mark Biviano of Searcy (coincidentally facing tough re-election battles) are fully ready to push for tax cuts in 2012, no matter how unlikely their passage. Williams promises his tax cuts will create jobs. This is meant to imply it will be a cure, with trickledown, for revenue reduction.

We have a decade of proof on the national level that tax cuts don't create jobs. We likewise have years of proof in Arkansas that capital gains tax cuts — the Republican default tax cut — are worthless as economic stimulus. We also have ample proof that giving away tax money to corporations is no economic boon. Yet still we persist, even to the point of giving companies money (think Dassault Falcon) that have reduced their workforce.

Taxes, in some respect, ARE too high. Our present state income tax was progressive when adopted in the mid-1970s. But a top marginal rate of 7 percent for all making more than $25,000 isn't progressive today, given what $25,000 is worth in 2011. Taxes are also too low in some cases. The scheme by which national corporations evade income taxes in Arkansas with bookkeeping tricks is well-known, but impervious to correction on account of the corporate lobby. The severance tax on natural gas doesn't begin to cover even local road damage of the drilling rigs, but the corporate lobby is again organizing to defeat a populist effort to increase it and thus get a meaningful return on depletion of the state's finite gas resource.

The tax code is full of such injustices in need of specific correction. But an overall tax cut? Only a Republican could argue for this with a straight face and silence about what public services would be cut to accommodate a tax break for the wealthy, sure to be the top beneficiary of any major Republican tax cut.

Would it be public schools, which consume about half the state budget and which must comply with the state Supreme Court's adequacy order? Nursing homes, filled with Medicaid-supported elderly? Colleges, where the state's decreasing support has already meant annual tuition increases that far outstrip inflation?

Then there's the prison population. Would a Republican really lead a charge to incarcerate fewer people? It's not likely. Republican legislators are already broadcasting near-daily reports on crimes by recidivist parolees to demonstrate the folly of sentence reductions for drug offenders. (The Republicans are not without basis in asking whether drug courts and expensive private-sector treatment programs will really save much money.)

There is one proven way to reduce at least some justice system expenses. That would be to end capital punishment, with its punishing legal costs. Can I get a Republican witness to this?

Didn't think so.

Favorite

From the ArkTimes store

Speaking of...

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Neighborliness, in Little Rock and beyond

    I had a parochial topic in mind this week — a surprise plan by Mayor Mark Stodola to address the Arkansas Arts Center's many needs.
    • Nov 19, 2015
  • Bootstraps for me, not thee

    Mean spirit, hypocrisy and misinformation abound among the rump minority threatening to wreck state government rather than allow passage of the state Medicaid appropriation if it continues to include the Obamacare-funded expansion of health insurance coverage for working poor.
    • Apr 14, 2016
  • Trump: The Obama of 2016?

    Conner Eldridge, the Democratic challenger to incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. John Boozman, launched an assault on Boozman Monday morning rich with irony and opportunity.
    • May 5, 2016

Most Shared

  • Conspiracy theorists

    Back in 2000, I interviewed Rev. Jerry Falwell on camera in connection with a documentary film of "The Hunting of the President," which Joe Conason and I wrote.
  • The health of a hospital

    The Medicaid expansion helped Baxter County Regional Medical Center survive and thrive, but a federal repeal bill threatens to imperil it and its patients.
  • Virgil, quick come see

    There goes the Robert E. Lee. But the sentiment that built the monument? It's far from gone.
  • Real reform

    Arkansas voters, once perversely skeptical of complicated ballot issues like constitutional amendments, have become almost comical Pollyannas, ratifying the most shocking laws.
  • That modern mercantile: The bARn

    The bARn Mercantile — "the general store for the not so general," its slogan says — will open in the space formerly occupied by Ten Thousand Villages at 301A President Clinton Ave.

Latest in Max Brantley

  • Virgil, quick come see

    There goes the Robert E. Lee. But the sentiment that built the monument? It's far from gone.
    • May 25, 2017
  • You want tort reform? Try this.

    The nursing home industry and the chamber of commerce finally defeated the trial lawyers in the 2017 legislature. The Republican-dominated body approved a constitutional amendment for voters in 2018 that they'll depict as close to motherhood in goodness.
    • May 18, 2017
  • French Hill's photo op

    The U.S. House of Representatives last week passed a health care bill that only the blind, dumb or dishonest could call good for any but the wealthy. For its many flaws, it has been hailed as a ticket to congressional gains for the Democratic Party.
    • May 11, 2017
  • More »

Visit Arkansas

Paddling the Fourche Creek Urban Water Trail

Paddling the Fourche Creek Urban Water Trail

Underutilized waterway is a hidden gem in urban Little Rock

Event Calendar

« »

May

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31  

Most Viewed

  • Not leaders

    As soon as I saw the Notre Dame graduates walking out of their own commencement ceremony as Vice President Mike Pence began to speak, I thought, "Oh no, here we go again."

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Conspiracy theorists

    • Gene Lyons' craft in writing his columns is superb. Many times, I don't agree with…

    • on May 29, 2017
  • Re: Virgil, quick come see

    • Runner55K Would you please clear up a mystery that has befuddled both my late fatherinlaw…

    • on May 29, 2017
  • Re: Not leaders

    • I like Autumn Tolbert's articles. She uses logical reasoning and makes some good points. My…

    • on May 28, 2017
 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation