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The biggest movie production in Arkansas ever 

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On Monday, production began on "MUD," Little Rock director Jeff Nichols' third film. The story focuses on two 14-year-old boys, played by Tye Sheridan ("Tree of Life") and a so-far-unamed Arkansas actor, who encounter a fugitive hiding out on an island on the Mississippi River and agree to help him reunite with the love of his life. Nichols has likened his vision of "MUD" to a Mark Twain story directed by Sam Peckinpah. Shooting will continue until mid-November throughout Arkansas, mainly in the southeast part of the state.

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