Favorite

The people's Arts Center 

The Arkansas Arts Center may no longer be the state's top cultural institution, but it remains the capital city's major cultural hub, despite its manifest needs, including a bigger and better building.

BRIAN CHILSON
  • Brian Chilson

The Arkansas Arts Center may no longer be the state's top cultural institution, but it remains the capital city's major cultural hub, despite its manifest needs, including a bigger and better building. A brief idea, now shelved, to build a wholly new institution in North Little Rock had allure for its boldness. It also prompted Little Rock officials to act.

The result is a tax increase of 2 cents on every dollar spent on hotel lodging in Little Rock. An election Feb. 9 will decide if that new money will be pledged to a $37.5 million bond issue for the Arts Center (and, in much smaller amounts, to the Museum of Arkansas Military History and the surrounding MacArthur Park.)

Great cities have great public infrastructure and cultural institutions. This demands support for the only idea on the table for improvement to the Arts Center. I only hope it's accompanied by more transparency and democracy.

Transparency? First, there's the matter of who's running the election show. A committee led by a prominent Chamber of Commerce businessman emerged as if by magic to campaign for the bond issue. Who appointed them? Who picked the political consultant that is running the show? Who will pay the campaign tab? Those are all secrets for now.

Then there's the election date. Mayor Mark Stodola describes this special election as a way to focus on the issue. Baloney. A special election is a technique used by schools, libraries and others to separate money questions from the broader participation in primary and general elections. I don't have a problem with the ploy. But I also don't see any point in blowing smoke about it.

The committee pushing the election says it will raise private money to pay for the cost of the special election. From whom? The people who will benefit from construction, bond and attorney fees on the project? Or someone else?

And speaking of private money: Backers of the Arts Center expansion swear that there will be a major — perhaps dollar-for-dollar — private match of the public investment. As yet, not a single private contributor has emerged. The election record in Little Rock is littered with undelivered private money promised for public-private partnerships. The most obvious and recent is the Little Rock Tech Park, another Chamber of Commerce idea that, so far, has seen only investment of working stiffs' sales tax pennies.

The dominance of the business establishment is evident in other ways. Leaders of the Arts Center campaign said, for example, that they were certain the Interstate 30 expansion project — the highway department wants to widen the downtown concrete divider to 10 lanes — would have no adverse impact on MacArthur Park. This is more chamber of commerce-manufactured baloney. The park rots on its fringes thanks to existing freeways. If the I-30 project is realized as currently conceived, it will mean still more freeway division. We must save MacArthur Park and the Arts Center lest the urban cancer continues to metastasize.

Success for the Arts Center demands broader support. Despite drawing on mailing lists of members of both park museums, an anemic six dozen or so turned out for the bond election pep rally.

The Arts Center is too often viewed as an institution for and by elites (though there's no greater leveler than art). No wonder. The elite insiders decide who sits on the board of this publicly owned institution. Members of that board also are expected to donate $5,000 to the Arts Center annually. This is not a bad support requirement for a private, nonprofit institution, but no financial tribute should be required for public service, certainly not to govern an institution hoping to get $37 million, plus interest, in public money. Even a democratic and diverse governing body would have little say over the wizard behind the curtain, the private foundation that owns much of the collection on display at the Arts Center. Good luck getting information from it. Which reminds me: Major arts institutions in most cities look first to private philanthropy, not public tax dollars, for major support. It rarely works that way in Little Rock.

We need a great Arts Center. But if it is to be publicly financed, it needs to be the people's arts center.

Favorite

Tags:

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • A real mayor

    Baker Kurrus is trying to brand himself as an agent for change as mayor of Little Rock, but labors under a handicap.
    • Nov 22, 2018
  • Arkansas Medicaid rule described as 'disastrous'

    Washington Post columnist Catherine Rampell today rips Gov. Asa Hutchinson's scheme to require computerized reporting of work to qualify for Medicaid as 'disastrous" and illustrates with some personal examples.
    • Nov 20, 2018
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning reported at Clark County Jail

    KARK reports that the Clark County sheriff has been forced to find alternative facilities for 47 county jail inmates following carbon monoxide poisoning last week in the Arkadelphia jail.
    • Nov 20, 2018
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Double-talk

    A couple of instances of doublespeak cropped up in Little Rock over the weekend.
    • Jun 29, 2017
  • Along the civil rights trail

    A convergence of events in recent days signaled again how far we have come and how far we have yet to go in civil rights.
    • Jan 18, 2018
  • The Oval outhouse

    One thing all Americans finally can agree upon is that public discourse has coarsened irretrievably in the era of Donald Trump and largely at his instance.
    • Jan 18, 2018

Latest in Max Brantley

  • A real mayor

    Baker Kurrus is trying to brand himself as an agent for change as mayor of Little Rock, but labors under a handicap.
    • Nov 22, 2018
  • How red are we?

    Election results in Arkansas were discouraging for Democrats and progressive voters.
    • Nov 15, 2018
  • For the teachers and for Kurrus

    Events in the Little Rock School District prompt me to say more about the Little Rock mayor's race in favor of Baker Kurrus.
    • Nov 1, 2018
  • More »

Most Viewed

  • Moms Demand, get results

    For too long, Arkansas lawmakers have been beholden to the gun lobby, and gun-violence prevention policies that are proven to save lives have been ignored. The Arkansas chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is working to change that.
  • Clean air news

    Amid the biblical fires, droughts, floods, hurricanes and rising seas that beset the heating Earth, the old blue orb occasionally absorbs some good news that suggests it may still harbor some hope for a sustainable future.
  • A real mayor

    Baker Kurrus is trying to brand himself as an agent for change as mayor of Little Rock, but labors under a handicap.
  • 2018: Complicated

    The last two election cycles redefined Arkansas politics. In 2014, the three distinguishing elements of Arkansas's politics — provincialism, personalism and populism — with roots back to the McMath era of the middle of the 20th century, died simultaneously as a Tom Cotton-style Republicanism roared into dominance in the state.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Embarrassed

    • Au contraire, Monsieur Lyons, Operation Iraqi Freedom was a fantastic success if you understand the…

    • on November 21, 2018
  • Re: On to 2020

    • My heart is with yours, Autumn. Joyce Elliott is my choice to run against Cotton…

    • on November 20, 2018
  • Re: On to 2020

    • I think Joyce Elliot would be an excellent candidate to run against Cotton in 2020…

    • on November 20, 2018
 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation