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The Powerful People and charters 

The Powerful People and charters

Out of the hundreds of words the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette used Sunday, Sept. 20 and the following Monday opining on education, one thing was correct. The paper wrote, "Rather than re-create the neighborhood-based schools that had recapitulated generations of poverty, the city created a network of public charter schools." Even in this sentence, one has to focus on the truth (neighborhood schools can be destructive), and not the blatant advertising for charter schools.

Pushing charters is the new parlance of the Powerful People (PP) along with maintaining their beloved private schools. From safe havens, they delight in exposing the details typical of destructive destitution dominant in schools populated almost entirely of the poor.

Only a few private schools (mostly Catholic) can say they were around before being private was a way to avoid integration. Even those few schools that were not originally for avoidance now accept folks ducking public schools. It requires a lot of money to operate a school so you cannot blame them for taking new students knowing that doing so hurts public schools. Dollars usually trump (pun intended) integrity.

Charter schools are a new (cheaper) way to avoid rowdy public schools. However, what happens if all of our schools become charters? Would there be good charters and bad charters? Would they, in effect, become the new neighborhood schools?

Does the magic of charters overcome the effects of poverty? The Democrat-Gazette editorial made it sound like that was the case in New Orleans. However, the facts speak differently. The DemGaz mentioned one article that pointed out the problems in New Orleans, and then tore it apart, a typical ploy of the PP. If you search "new orleans charter schools" you can read as many (perhaps more) cons as pros.

Richard Emmel

Little Rock

From the web

In response to last week's cover story, "Stranded":

So does it follow that in the absence of foster families DCFS fails to place at-risk, abused and neglected children who need to be in care?

Of course it does.

We are so infatuated with the fetus and do not protect children no longer in the uterus.

PMM

The solution is pretty easy: Increase the pay of DCFS workers. If the state did that it would suddenly have an influx of well qualified, caring individuals who would help sort out this whole mess. There's very little incentive right now to stay working at DCFS. Make it more appealing for great folks to apply and actually STAY. But we all know that politicians talk a good game about fixing DCFS when articles like this come out or when Justin Harris get caught being evil but nothing ever changes sadly.

Christine Robertson

From the time we initially were asked about being foster parents, it took about 16 months to finally go through classes, paperwork, home studies, etc. Everyone involved seemed overworked. You could go for months without hearing anything and then suddenly you had to be available the next day for a house check — no warning till the last minute. Once you do get to have foster kids, the minute one is about to leave, you get tons of calls for taking another child. The system needs so very many more employees to get homes open efficiently and to follow kids in the system.

Noma Kellner

Great investigation, guys. Seems like a lot of he said she said, nonsupported allegations from the aggrieved, and the turning of a blind's eye. For example, the garage incident seems like a lot worse than just being less than perfect parents.

Slithey Tove

I'm not sure "the garage incident seems like a lot worse than just being less than perfect parents."

Of course a lot depends on the weather and many other variables, but have you ever let your kids camp in the back yard for example?

The nonsupported allegations? DHS employees and others in a similar situation aren't free to comment, pro or con, to such situations.

Doigotta

In response to "Trump, Carson top new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll. Huckawho?" a Sept. 27 Arkansas Blog post:

Poor, poor Huck. All dressed up and so few places to so places to go.

He should make gobs of money on the crazy religion tour. I believed it all along (granted, not much of a revelation) that this was all about padding his wallet and less about saving the country. Mission accomplished!

We should be proud of the Huckster and his moves as one of the finest carpetbaggers we've ever seen.

yapperjohn

What does it say when over half of those polled would vote for one of the none-of-the-above candidates? That not even Republicans can stand Republicans?

DancesWithLizards

My less affluent Republican friends seem to be all eat up with Donald Trump. The reason appears to be "Trumps Kick Ass of anyone not white or with a funny name" attitude.

So Huck might get more than 578 supporters if he'd come out totally Chuck Norris-Terminator-whatever's worse than the Terminator — morphing into a Jeffery Dahmer, eater of all minorities, maybe.

Huck should kill a minority or a gay and walk around holding up the blood dripping head. Or find a day care filled with Mexican kids and burn it down, kids and all. Man, he's got to do something quick if he wants to keep sucking up the money.

Beware of Robo-Huck!!!

DeathbyInches

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