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The Week That Was, Sept. 22-28, 2010 

It was a good week for ...

LAWSUITS. A challenge was filed to the legislature's bad decision to roll up three utterly distinct constitutional amendments – including one to jack up the limit on interest – into one. This combo was forced in part, of course, by the pressing need to reserve one of the legislature's three allotted amendments for a needless bit of demagoguery about the "right to hunt."

It was a bad week for ...

FOOTBALL. A supercharged record crowd in Fayetteville saw the Razorbacks fall just short in a 24-20 loss to top-ranked Alabama.

ARKANSAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSIONER RON PIERCE. He denounced the mountain of science behind global climate change as corrupt and discredited, according to a newspaper account. He's a Huckabee appointee, naturally.

LOTTERY COMMISSIONER SMOKEY CAMPBELL. He indicated he was perturbed that students who received multiple college scholarships, including the lottery scholarship, might be getting money in excess of tuition, fees and books. Some of them might even be eating on the overage, he harrumphed. The idea of the lottery, of course, was to increase college-going support for students, not nickel and dime them over, as Campbell carped, "a cheeseburger at Sonic."

ARKANSAS CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL. A jury awarded $20 million in damages for the hospital's negligence in a surgery performed on the wrong side of a teenager's brain.

SCHOOL BOARD INCUMBENTS. Voters in the Little Rock and Pulaski County school districts tossed out all three incumbents facing opposition in the annual school election. It was a victory for the teachers union in Pulaski County. In Little Rock, it was another vote on the path to a change in superintendents (see Max Brantley's column).

The LITTLE ROCK BOARD OF DIRECTORS. It cobbled up a special ordinance to prevent a private club hoping to move into the city from staying open until 5 a.m. Why not make ALL existing clubs close at 2 a.m., rather than targeting just a new operator (if, indeed, they legally can)?

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