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To-do list, Feb. 12 

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THURSDAY 2/12

 

GIRL TALK

9 p.m., Revolution. $15.

 

Despite what you may have heard, Girl Talk isn't sold out. All advance tickets are gone, but Revolution has reserved 100 that'll be available when the doors open at 7 p.m. Better get there earlier, the hordes are sure to descend. And for what exactly? To see Greg Gillis, a 27-year-old former biomedical engineer, push buttons on his laptop and dance spasmodically? Well, yeah, sort of. But don't discount the spasmodic dancing. Watch a clip of a past show on YouTube; whether it's by stripping down to his underwear, lighting things on fire or employing synchronized dancers, Gillis knows how to get a party hype. But even more than the chance to see a skinny white dude in his skivvies, the crowds come because Gillis pushes dance floor populism to previously unimagined heights. On his latest, widely-beloved album, “Feed the Animals,” he sampled snippets of some 320 different songs, layering bits of Huey Lewis on top of Lil Mama, Temple of the Dog on Lil Wayne and T.I. over Sinead O'Connor — and that's just on the first song. It's attention-deprived and omnivorous, perfect for the web sprawl that seems to dominate our era. Surprisingly danceable, too. The electro-pop duo Mad Happy opens. LM.

 

 

FRIDAY 2/13

 

EAGLES OF

DEATH METAL

10 p.m., Juanita's. $18 adv., $20 d.o.s.

 

Those familiar with Josh Homme's role in Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss and Desert Sessions know that this show is bound to be a barnburner to write home about. Homme's self-described “musical schizophrenia” keeps him in high demand. Buddies since high school, Homme and fellow Eagles of Death Metal guitarist Jesse “The Devil” Hughes (nicknamed by Homme for his methods of enacting total vengeance upon bullies) have kept this project alive for 11 years. The band name stems from Homme's reaction to a friend's urging him to embrace death metal bands, and after hearing Vader, Homme commented they sounded like “the Eagles of death metal.” Opening for Guns N' Roses' 2006 tour, the band didn't go over so well with the audience — Axl Rose asked the crowd if they'd had enough of the “Pigeons of Shit Metal.” A satirical statement issued by EODM in response is certainly worth a read, and the band was paid in full for the tour and even asked to rejoin it later. Also of interest is Hughes' devout Republican loyalty and activism. The Nugent-esque, credentialed journalist and former Republican speechwriter comes complete with NRA membership and claims Obama is a commie. But he believes hunting isn't fair, once saying, “I don't like hunting because they can't shoot back.” Reportedly at the request of EODM, local bar rockers Smoke Up Johnny open the 21-and-up show, which could very likely sell out. Catch a Q&A with Hughes on our entertainment blog, Rock Candy. PP.

 

 

CLUTCH

8 p.m., the Village. $20-$23.

 

A recipe for Clutch includes the following ingredients, if not more: a loading dose of hard rock, a dash of punkish metal, a truckload of stoned grooves and some Southern rock seasoning. Simply put, they're a classic rock band with an ultra modern sweep. It's heritage music re-distributed by a 21st century attitude. But for as hard as these guys get, I've yet to hear a Clutch number that you couldn't shake your moneymaker to, or sweat it out to in a bruising mosh pit. But it's a bad-luck day for torn loyalties, as Juanita's has one helluva show Friday as well. We may have to resort to a coin toss. Last year's Clutch show at the Village was one for the books, and this one should be no exception, considering three supporting acts, Willem Maker, the Bakerton Group and Red Fang, are in line to set the mood, which I'm guessing will be festively aggressive. If any of them are half as good as last year's opener, this concert should be both the ticket and the ride. PP.

 

‘MANCINI AND MOONLIGHT'

8 p.m., Robinson Center Music Hall. $17-$72.

 

For Valentine's weekend, the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra mines the catalog of Henry Mancini, the master of the film and TV score. In a career that spanned four decades, Mancini won four Oscars and 20 Grammys (he was nominated for 72!). The ASO, with help from Broadway singers Rosena Hill and Edward Watts, reviews some of Mancini's most famous compositions, many of them written with Johnny Mercer. They're songs you should know by heart: the theme from “Pink Panther,” “Baby Elephant Walk,” “Moon River,” “The Days of Wine and Roses,” “It Had Better Be Tonight,” the theme from “Peter Gunn,” “Charade,” “Two for the Road” and more.

Hill's Broadway CV includes roles in “The Color Purple,” “Oklahoma” and “Riverdance on Broadway.” Watts recently starred at the New York City Opera in “The Most Happy Fella.” The ASO reprises the show on Saturday; same time, same price. LM.

 

 

SATURDAY 2/14

 

WINSTON FAMILY ORCHESTRA RECORD RELEASE SHOW

10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $5.

 

Sulac, of Loch Ness Monster (see our Showcase coverage), keeps busy. He sings and plays guitar with the X-ish (i.e. the John Doe and Exene Cervenka-ish) band Hector Faceplant, performs solo and plays drums and sings in this bouncy pop-rock band. Saturday, the trio — comprised of Liz Carroll (keyboard, vocals), Kristen Goodwin (bass) and Sulac — celebrates the release of its debut, “Valloween.” Expect, and this may come as a surprise to those who only know Sulac through Loch Ness, super-catchy pysch pop. They'll have plenty of friends there to help them celebrate. Stella Fancy plays garage-y lounge pop. San Antokyo specializes in meaty, head-bobbing rawk, and newly reunited Chow Quay kicks out spiky, punk-inflected rock 'n' roll. LM.

 

 

SUNDAY 2/15

 

FOXY SHAZAM

7 p.m., the Village. $8 adv., $10 d.o.s.

 

Who said the kids don't know how to throw a party? In a sea of young, weepy white boys hiding behind punk-pop riffs and angular haircuts, Cincinnati's Foxy Shazam rise above, not by sacrificing bombast or soaring vocals, but by trading emo (or its louder and faster cousin, screamo) for a brand of glammed-out hardcore pop that's novel among the band's contemporaries — it's really fun. The typical bass, guitar and fiercely banged drums share the stage with bouncy piano and lead singer Eric Sean Nally's huge, wild vocals. Here's betting that, even on the Lord's day, a dance party breaks out. The A.K.A.s and Dr. Manhattan open. LM.

 

 

TUESDAY 2/17

 

‘AVENUE Q'

7 p.m., Walton Arts Center. $20-$58.

 

There's a disclaimer on the on the Walton Arts page about the show that reads, “Avenue Q has not been authorized or approved in any manner by The Jim Henson Company or Sesame Workshop, which have no responsibility for its content.” In other words, don't blame “Sesame Street” when you find it that its residents (or at least their alter-egos) have grown up to be profane, self-doubting post-collegiates, who've replaced spelling bees and number games with songs and stories about sex, unemployment and crystal meth. The musical debuted in 2003, won almost universal praise (“one of the funniest shows you're ever likely to see,” Entertainment Weekly gushed) and swept the 2004 Tony Awards, winning Best Musical, Best Score and Best Book. Theater aficionados will remember “Q” for its Arkansas connection: Fayetteville native Jason Moore directed the musical's original Broadway run (he's currently helming “Shrek”). The traveling production sticks around in Fayetteville through Sunday, Feb. 22. LM. 

 

 

WEDNESDAY 2/18

 

A.A. BONDY

10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $5.

 

Those who were paying close attention to indie rock in the early '90s might remember Bondy as the bleached-blond front man for Birmingham's Verbena. Back then, Bondy's vocals vacillated between mumbles and piercing screams. His band specialized in dark, searing music rooted on big pop hooks. Dave Grohl produced the group's major label debut in 1999. They were hailed as the second coming of Nirvana. When that didn't pan out and Verbena fizzled, Bondy retreated to his home in upstate New York, wrote new songs and emerged with a batch of meditative indie folk. Last year, he released his solo debut, “American Hearts,” under his birth name, on Fat Possum. There's no shade of '90s angst to be found in this new project. Just a big voice, wielded gently, an acoustic guitar and lyrics of love and loss and God and evil. Here's a good one:  “Love, don't die / It just goes from girl to girl.” LM.  

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