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To-do list, Jan. 29 

 

THURSDAY 1/29

 

THE WEISENHEIMERS

10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $5.

 

Kindred strummers and shirtless drummers — that's what this rock band is made of.

Since the last Weisenheimers CD release show failed miserably to deliver on its promise of having merchandise to sell, don't expect tonight's audience to be nearly as understanding and forgiving if guitarist Mark Wyers, who still credits UPS for the mistake, shows up with more empty boxes and promises. He assures me they're in his trunk, which is where he'll be found days later should this happen twice. So anyway, I had the distinct pleasure of sharing suds and grub with this crew sometime last December in celebration of Mark's 103rd birthday, and a nicer bunch of rowdy rockers is hard to find. Drummer “Dirty Sean” wore a shirt (state law) and only had 16 beers before taking his child to a church function. Guitarist Micah Wyers was nice enough to clean calzone from his beard  — with a fork. His brother Mark tearfully went on and on about UPS to his infant son and wife and lead vocalist/bassist Karle Johnson remained sharp-witted and pretty well-mannered, considering the company. In any event, this show features two Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase semi-finalists (Magic Hassle opens), and CDs or no, is certainly worth checking out. PP.

 

 

THE PRETTY THINGS PEEP SHOW

8 p.m., Revolution. $8 adv., $10 d.o.s.

 

Little Rock's been treated to a fair amount of burlesque in recent years, but never as traditional and agenda-less as “The Pretty Things Peep Show.” Like traveling vaudeville shows of yore (or at least the days of yore as glimpsed in “Playboy” cartoons), “Pretty Things” has a fire-breather, a sword swallower, a contortionist, a fast-talking MC and a host of betassled, nearly naked ladies. But you know, with more boas and bustiers than spandex and G-strings, dancing to rockabilly, not rap. (In fact, a promo video for the show features co-founder Bettina May losing her evening gown to “Red Headed Woman” by Sonny Burgess of Newport.) Pin-up devotees can audition online to be a “stage maid” for the peep show online at myspace.com/prettythingspeepshow. All it takes is a stage name, a photo and a pitch. Male or female welcome. LM.

 

 

FRIDAY 1/30

 

COOL SHOES

10 p.m., Downtown Music. $5.

 

The beat goes on … and on and on. Little Rock's dancin'-est monthly shindig returns for the first time in the New Year with the same formula as before: three DJs, a short performance, live art and lots and lots of young folk. Except this go 'round the kids won't actually be “kids” strictly defined. Last month, some 450 tried to pack into the club, so in order to keep the party manageable, organizers are limiting admittance to those over 18 (they've spun off another event, Reverb, that's open to all ages). This time out, look for DJ sets from K. Carpenzo (disco, house), Shawn Lee (hip-hop) and local-gone-international collective Deviant Soundsystem (electro, house). The latter is doing several shows in LA in February and one in Miami in March, so surely it's doing something right. Also, local rapper Shea Marie, Grim Muzik's resident diva, offers a short set and UCA art professor Ray Ogar contributes live art. Vintage boutique Magpie and Birdie hosts a fashion show and trunk sale, too. LM.

 

 

JONATHAN WILKINS

10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $5.

 

Originally from St. Louis, this singer/songwriter, who you'll often find working the door at White Water, found his way into Central Arkansas's vibrant folk punk scene through Conway, where he schooled at Hendrix. All the guys who run White Water — Mat Mahar, Ben Nichols (at least in part) — they all came through Faulkner County, too. Since his college days, Wilkins, who writes smart, funny, confessional songs and sings them somewhere between a growl and a shout, has performed out often and self-released homemade material, much of which is available for free download at jonathanwilkins.com, at brisk pace, too. But “Highway Robbery,” the release of which he's celebrating on Friday, is his first, real-deal official album. Recorded with Will Boyd (American Princes), Isaac Alexander (Big Silver, the Easys) and Todd Beene (Glossary), the album comes out via fledgling local label Last Chance Records. It's $8. Dallas country-tinged rockers Slider Pines open. LM

 

 

‘THREE BLIND MICE'

7 p.m., Children's Theatre, Arkansas Arts Center. $10-$14.

 

Based on the Mother Goose nursery rhyme, the latest from the Arkansas Children's Theatre follows three young, curious mice, who journey into “Big Kitchen World” in search of cheese. They flirt with death to find out if the lyrics of “Three Blind Mice” hold true, if the farmer's wife really will try to cut off their tales. When the mice find themselves trapped, “the most unlikely hero comes to their rescue,” says the promo capsule. This looks to have one of those don't-believe-everything-you-hear morals. The play continues through Feb. 15. Performance times are 7 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. LM.

 

 

SATURDAY, 1/31

 

LIPPIZZANER STALLIONS

2 p.m., 7 p.m., Alltel Arena. $24.25-$31.25.

 

Even though the horses are out of the gate at Oaklawn, expect plenty of equine lovers to turn out for the annual return of the World Famous Lippizzaner Stallions. From highly-controlled, stylized jumps to other movements known as the “airs above the ground,” their liveliness and grace promise to astound. The Lipizzan breed dates back to the 16th century, when it was developed with the support of the Hapsurg nobility, and the ancestors of the Lipizzan can be traced to approximately A.D. 800. By the 16th century, when the Hapsburgs ruled both Spain and Austria, a powerful but agile horse was desired for both military use and for use in the fashionable and rapidly-growing riding schools for the nobility of central Europe. Today, the principles taught at the Spanish Riding School are based on practices taught to calvary riders to prepare their horses for warfare. Horse lovers will certainly want take advantage of the opportunity to witness this rare and valuable breed when the stallions perform at Alltel Arena. PP

 

 

DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND

8:30 p.m., Revolution. $12 adv., $15 d.o.s.

 

The Crescent City is known for harvesting its own flavor of swamp-boogie funk, voodoo blues and traditional Dixieland jazz roots. But combine those three and the result is truly original. I saw the Dirty Dozen Brass Band open for the Black Crowes at Robinson in 1995, then at a glorified juke joint-ish venue in Portland, Maine, two years later and this much is true: They'll inject a shot of groove straight into a venue and turn it into a rump-shaking festival. Even though there are only nine members in its lineup, the band sounds like a full-bore marching platoon from the moment it launches into the opening number, which often is the title track to its 1984 debut album “My Feet Can't Fail Me Now.” Established in 1977, DDBB revolutionized the New Orleans brass band style by incorporating funk and bebop, and has been a major influence on the majority of New Orleans brass bands since. If you want three decades of culture, history and badass Big Easy sounds rolled up and twisted tight, make plans for this one. Support act Fundamental Elements opens the 18-and-up show. PP.

 

 

 

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