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To-do list, June 25 

THURSDAY 6/25

 

HILL COUNTRY REVUE

9 p.m., Revolution. $10.

 

Last seen strumming a musical, um, pleasure device in the too-hot-for-TV episode of MTV's “$5 Cover,” Cody Dickinson rolls into town with another batch of Allstars, some of whom you might recognize. There's Chris Chew, the bassist for North Mississippi Allstars, who along with the brothers Dickinson, has put out three Grammy-nominated albums. There's former blues prodigy Kirk Smithhart, who received the Albert King award for Best Guitarist by the Blues Foundation when he was 19; Daniel Robert Coburn, whose former band Dixie Hustler's debut was produced, in part, by Kid Rock, and Edward Cleveland, who's toured with Shalamar. Active since Luther Dickinson took up with the Black Crowes and the NMAS went on hiatus, the revue specializes in the same kind of jam-y blues-rock that's earned the Allstars legions of fans, but with a little extra swampy edge. This show finds the band touring behind “Make a Move,” its just released debut on Razor & Tie. LM.  

 

 

FRIDAY 6/26

 

JUSTIN MOORE

8 p.m., The Village. $16 adv., $20 d.o.s.

 

There's a lot in rising country star Justin Moore's official bio about his young life in Poyen (Grant County), population 272 in the last census. He grew up on 100 acres. His grandma's name was Faynette. One of his grandfathers — PaPa — had him up in a deer stand before he was one. There's nothing but a “filling station” and a “florist in a old trailer” in Poyen. It's all in service of leading us to believe that when Moore sings something like, “It's a dirt road, a fishin' pole, a cold beer sittin on a tailgate, an old church, a kind word, it's where I was born and raised,” he's speaking from experience and not just stringing together a bunch of cliches. Either way, it's the niche Moore's carving out on his first singles. “Small Town, U.S.A.” defends country living (“everybody knows me and I know them and that's the way I believe we were supposed to live”); “Back That Thing Up” imagines a cowgirl who needs some teaching (“I know you ain't never milked a cow before”), and “I Could Kick Your Ass” is pretty straightforward. All are available in a digital only EP that'll have to sate home-state fans until Moore's major label debut comes out in August. Ryan Couron and Hwy 5 open. LM.

 

PINK SPIDERS

8 p.m., Vino's, $10.

 

Since 2003, Nashville soul-pop-punkers Pink Spiders have cranked out records, toured incessantly, harvested some mainstream attention and rubbed elbows with industry heavy-hitters, all the while remaining true to a trashy, gritty, hip-grinding sound for which they cite the Cars, the Who, Marvin Gaye, Cheap Trick and a host of others as influences. Songs of chaotic life on the road abound, such as “Gimme Chemicals” and “Sleeping on the Floor,” and there's no shortage of actual hardship tales, such as a trailer fire in Buffalo, sleeping in New York City subways and the 2008 school (tour) bus fire that engulfed “clothes, laptops, passports, id's, ipods, cameras, receipts, cash, song lyrics, everything,” resulting in a mad plea for donations. This could be a rare opportunity to catch the Spiders, currently recording with former Talking Heads member Jerry Harrison, in a more intimate venue. Fiery indie rock act Magic Hassle opens. PP.

 

FOAM FEST

6 p.m., River Market Pavilions. $25 adv., $30 at door.

 

If only the folks who put on the Foam Party at Juanita's last weekend, where scantily clad youths grinded in a sea of soap bubbles, and those who organize Foam Fest, where people of all ages above 21 sample dozens of varieties of beers, could get together, then we'd be on to something. Until then, the Foam Fest will have to lean on this proposition: For $22 to $30 (if you're part of a group of 10, you get in for $22), you'll get three hours to drink yourself silly. And broadly. There'll be more than 65 varieties of beer and wine from all around the world. Plus, there's music to dance badly and slur along to, from Fayetteville folk rockers the Sarah Hughes Band (6 p.m.) and Little Rock dance band standby Mr. Happy (7:15). Just before the drink-a-thon wraps up, a people's choice award will be presented to the favorite brew. All proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation. Advance tickets are available at foamfest.org. LM.

 

SATURDAY 6/27

 

 

CELTIC WOMAN

8 p.m., Alltel Arena, $40-$58.

 

Flipping channels recently, I paused on AETN to watch an ensemble of five young women sing traditional numbers and perform in what appeared to be a European cathedral, accompanied by a composer and beautiful stage scenery. I was either stoned (as a co-worker charges), or maybe the angelic voices hailing from five criminally attractive Irish women were enough to pierce the hard exterior of this weathered acid rocker. Although the foundation for Celtic Woman's popularity outside of Ireland and Europe was previously set by artists Enya and Clannad, along with stage shows “Riverdance” and “Lord of the Dance,” credit Celtic Woman's American popularity to a 2005 PBS broadcast that resulted in their debut album skyrocketing to No. 1 on Billboard's World Music charts and holding that position for a record 81 weeks. Expect the heavens to part when these lasses deliver their world-class performance at Alltel Arena. PP.

 

 

LIVING SACRIFICE

10 p.m., Vino's, $12 adv., $15 d.o.s. 

 

Whatever elusive and lab-tested formula that allows local bands to stick around forever, Living Sacrifice has tapped into it. Since 1989, the band's evolved through many of the sub-genres of metal, like thrash, death, groove, metallic, and, hardly surprising to many of us, Christian. Indeed, this spiritual posse of seasoned pros is as every bit comparable to Slayer as Stryper is to Poison. With two original members in vocalist/guitarist Bruce Fitzhugh and drummer Lance Garvin, who also plays with Soul Embraced, today's incarnation also consists of former Evanescence drummer Rocky Gray, singing and playing guitar, and bassist Arthur Green. The band recently announced that a new album is coming sometime this year, so loyalists may get a taste of new tunes. Ashes of Augustine and Dreading Sundown open the show. PP

 

 

WEDNESDAY 7/1

 

‘WHEN HARRY

MET SALLY'

Sundown, Riverfest Amphitheatre. Free.

 

Years before Billy Crystal effectively quit acting to follow the Yankees or bask in his golden years or whatever and Meg Ryan messed up her face trying to stay young and went through a binge that continues of terrible movies, the pair made this film, which, despite any later sins or false moves, assured them of a spot as a golden couple in film comedy for years to come. Scripted by Nora Ephron and directed by Rob Reiner, the film mines an age-old question: Can men and women truly be platonic friends? Crystal, in dry, pop-philosophizing Woody Allen mode, says no, sex gets away. Ryan, bubbly, charmingly odd and at the height of her America's sweetheart phase even in those terrible pantsuits, disagrees. Through chance encounters, break-ups and ultimately a friendship, that tension propels the plot. Along the way, we get Harry Connick Jr. doing standards, funny interludes with old couples talking about their relationships and Meg Ryan faking an orgasm in a New York deli. It's bound to bring folks out in droves. Better bring some cold drinks; it's hot out there. LM.

 

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