Favorite

UAMS surgeon to present breast cancer findings 

Press Release

UAMS Medical Center

UAMS Surgeon to Present Breast Cancer

Research Findings at National Symposium

LITTLE ROCK — V. Suzanne Klimberg, M.D., director of the breast cancer program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), will present the results of an innovative breast cancer treatment study at the 29th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Dec. 14-17 in San Antonio, Texas.

Klimberg is the principal investigator of a multiphase clinical trial for the new procedure designed to reduce or eliminate the need for follow-up surgery, reduce recurrence of breast cancer at the original site, and even reduce the need for radiation treatment.

Nationwide, about 40 percent of breast cancer patients require a second surgery to remove additional malignant tissue. Recent results of the study from UAMS found that 91 percent of breast cancer patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by radiofrequency ablation (eRFA) did not require a second surgery to remove additional malignant tissue. UAMS is the first hospital to use the procedure to treat breast cancer.

Klimberg presented the preliminary results of the clinical trial at the 92nd Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons in Chicago on Oct.10. The study lasted from July 2002-January 2005 and now includes about 90 patients at the UAMS Arkansas Cancer Research Center.

“I believe eRFA represents an important area for further research,” Klimberg said. “Not only will the procedure reduce the need for additional surgery in many cases, it also provides a better cosmetic result.”

Klimberg is chief of the Division of Breast Surgical Oncology at UAMS and a professor in the Departments of Surgery and Pathology. She also is director of the Breast Program at the UAMS’ Arkansas Cancer Research Center as well as director of Breast Fellowship in Diseases of the Breast at UAMS.

eRFA begins with standard removal of the tumor. Then, an RFA probe is inserted and heated to 100 degrees for 15 minutes, creating a one centimeter zone of dead tissue around the cavity. The procedure is intended to give the patient a cancer-free area around the site where the tumor was removed so that a second surgery in the area is unnecessary.

Favorite

Speaking of Medical News

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Arkansas Times Staff

  • New episode of Rock the Culture podcast: 'Unify Our City'

    Perspective and conversation about the Washington Post exposé on the Little Rock Police Department’s use of no-knock warrants and a political radio ad alleging that black people should vote republican to avoid being lynched again. Guest: Little Rock Mayoral Candidate Frank Scott.
    • Oct 23, 2018
  • New episode of Out in Arkansas: 'T & A Talk'

    Out in Arkansas’s hosts Traci Berry and Angie Bowen talk about all the things...winter rescue, being kind...you know, all the things. Thank you for listening!
    • Oct 19, 2018
  • New episode of Out in Arkansas: 'T & A with Guest Dr. Racher, the Ninja Gyno'

    Out in Arkansas’s hosts Traci Berry and Angie Bowen are joined by Dr. Racher, the ninja Gyno. They talk about all the things that come with transitioning— at any phase of the spectrum and all of those special people in their lives who live through this transition with them.
    • Oct 11, 2018
  • More »

More by Crystal Wallis

Latest in Medical Community

  • UAMS earns 10-year reaccreditation

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) recently learned that it has been reaccredited another 10 years by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
    • Oct 16, 2007
  • UAMS performs 7,000th stem-cell transplant

    The internationally known treatment program for multiple myeloma at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) reached another milestone today (Oct. 10) as Jeffrey Zwerin of California received the 7,000th stem-cell transplant procedure perfor
    • Oct 10, 2007
  • Richard Morrison receives endowed chair

    Richard P. Morrison, M.D., today became the inaugural recipient of the Chair in Sciences Basic to Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).
    • Oct 9, 2007
  • More »
 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation