Favorite

UAMS/ACH center at Lowell opens 

 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. (May 11, 2007) – The Centers for Children in Lowell celebrated its grand opening today as part of a collaborative project of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH). The new facility provides developmental and subspecialty medical care to children in northwest Arkansas, provided by physicians from UAMS and ACH.

The center, located in a 40,000-square-foot, two-story building at 519 Latham Drive, houses the Schmieding Developmental Center, the Schmieding KIDS FIRST program and various regional clinics, all previously located in Fayetteville and Springdale.

UAMS Chancellor I. Dodd Wilson, M.D.; ACH President and Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Bates, M.D.; and Gov. Mike Beebe helped cut the ribbon with supporters and four children who are served by the center.

“We are very pleased to be able to make subspecialty and developmental care available in one location that will be more convenient for parents,” said Wilson.

“With this new, shared outreach, thousands of families will not have to make the long trip to Little Rock for their child’s initial evaluation or clinic visits for follow-up medical attention,” said Bates.

UAMS broke ground on the new facility March 20, 2006. On Jan. 25, the Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH) Board of Directors and the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees approved a statewide working collaborative between the UAMS Department of Pediatrics and ACH called Centers for Children that includes the Lowell location.

The programs moved into the new building shortly afterward. The statewide collaborative includes 24 existing clinics throughout the state where services are provided by ACH or the UAMS Department of Pediatrics.

Others who made remarks at the morning ceremony were Debra H. Fiser, M.D., dean of the UAMS College of Medicine, and Lowell Mayor Perry Long, who along with Richard Jacobs, M.D., interim chairman of the UAMS Department of Pediatrics, joined in cutting the ribbon.

Other guests included local pediatricians, community leaders, state and local elected officials and project partners. The celebration included refreshments, guided tours and children’s activities

The collaborative was formed to improve access to pediatric subspecialty care, support education and training of UAMS medical students and residents, and strengthen and expand the regional clinics, also located in El Dorado, Fort Smith, Harrison, Helena/West Helena, Jonesboro, Mountain View and Texarkana.


Nearly 14,000 patients from northwest Arkansas were treated at Arkansas Children’s Hospital during 2006, and this extension of services in Lowell is expected to improve the flow of appointments in Little Rock.

Physicians who are employed by the UAMS Department of Pediatrics but practice at Arkansas Children’s Hospital will commute in large part to the center in Lowell on a rotating basis. Some faculty and other staff members will reside in Lowell or nearby communities. Pediatric subspecialty services offered in Lowell include adolescent medicine, allergy, cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, nephrology, neurology, pulmonology and rheumatology.

Schmieding KIDS FIRST is a comprehensive, early-intervention program for infants and young children with medical conditions and developmental delays. UAMS operates 11 KIDS FIRST centers across the state. The Schmieding Developmental Center provides medical and neuropsychological assessments for children with developmental disorders.


The KIDS FIRST program is located on the first floor of the Centers for Children, with the developmental center and regional clinics housed on the second floor. ACH and UAMS will share equally the expenses of the 10-year lease of the building, owned by The Pinnacle Group of Rogers.

Favorite

From the ArkTimes store

Speaking of Medical News

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Most Shared

  • In the margins

    A rediscovered violin concerto brings an oft-forgotten composer into the limelight.
  • Donald Trump is historically unpopular — and not necessarily where you think

    My colleagues John Ray and Jesse Bacon and I estimate, in the first analysis of its kind for the 2018 election season, that the president's waning popularity isn't limited to coastal cities and states. The erosion of his electoral coalition has spread to The Natural State, extending far beyond the college towns and urban centers that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. From El Dorado to Sherwood, Fayetteville to Hot Springs, the president's approval rating is waning.
  • Arkansans join House vote to gut Americans with Disabilities Act

    Despite fierce protests from disabled people, the U.S. House voted today, mostly on party lines, to make it harder to sue businesses for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. Of course Arkansas congressmen were on the wrong side.

Latest in Medical Community

  • UAMS earns 10-year reaccreditation

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) recently learned that it has been reaccredited another 10 years by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
    • Oct 16, 2007
  • UAMS performs 7,000th stem-cell transplant

    The internationally known treatment program for multiple myeloma at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) reached another milestone today (Oct. 10) as Jeffrey Zwerin of California received the 7,000th stem-cell transplant procedure perfor
    • Oct 10, 2007
  • Richard Morrison receives endowed chair

    Richard P. Morrison, M.D., today became the inaugural recipient of the Chair in Sciences Basic to Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).
    • Oct 9, 2007
  • More »

Event Calendar

« »

February

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28  

Most Viewed

  • Locked away and forgotten

    In 2017, teenagers committed to rehabilitative treatment at two South Arkansas juvenile lockups did not receive basic hygiene and clothing supplies and lived in wretched conditions.

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation