Favorite

UCA money woes 

In addition to its other problems involving Lu Hardin, who resigned as president under fire last month, the University of Central Arkansas has been forced to cut operating expenditures, particularly on scholarships, under pressure from the state Department of Higher Education. 

DHE Director Jim Purcell and Deputy Director Steve Floyd met with UCA administrators earlier this year, concerned about UCA  operating deficits, and urged the University to make corrections.

UCA Interim President Tom Courtway said that UCA had responded by reducing scholarship expenditures by about $3.5 million from the roughly $20 million it had been spending, and by making other adjustments to operating expenditures. He said that Paul McLendon, UCA vice president for financial services, had assured him that that UCA would not have a deficit for the fiscal year that ended June 30. The audit for that year is underway now.

Courtway said that UCA had shown an operating deficit of about $1 million for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2006, and about $5 million for the year that ended June 30, 2007. He said much of the deficit resulted from the fact that the state funding formula for colleges and universities lagged behind expenses when an institution was growing rapidly, as UCA has been in recent years. A $1.5 million award made against UCA by the state Claims Commission because of an automobile accident also contributed to the $5 million deficit, Courtway said.

 

Pizza coming

U.S. Pizza's shop at 2814 Kavanaugh closed Sunday in anticipation of reopening about a block away in a remodeled Masonic lodge on Kavanaugh. A spokesman said at press time that the opening was tentatively scheduled for Wednesday. (EDITOR'S NOTE: Since then, the Times has learned that it may be later than Wednesday.) The remodeling of the building for the restaurant has been in progress more than two years.

 

School board wrinkle

Early voting in school elections began this week and one to watch might be the Zone 1 race in Little Rock between incumbent Katherine Mitchell and Dr. Lee C. Nayles. Nayles has withdrawn from the race, but too late for his name to be removed from the ballot. So he still could be elected. If he took the oath of office and then resigned, the School Board would choose a successor. Since the Board has been split along racial lines on most votes, that could produce a tie vote among the remaining six members. Then the job would go to the Quorum Court.This conversation is mostly academic. But there's a quiet campaign to encourage votes against Mitchell.

 

Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Arkansas Times Staff

  • Friday's headlines and your holiday open line

    What happened at the State Board of Education and what does it mean; Legislation filed for Hutchinson's government reorganization plan; Pediatric flu-related death in Arkansas reported; Suspect arrested in unsolved 2008 North Little Rock homicide.
    • Dec 21, 2018
  • New episode of Rock the Culture: "Juice In Your Own Life"

    In this week’s episode, Charles and Antwan provide perspective and conversation on the Little Rock Mayoral Election and State Board of Education’s consideration of the anticipated request to waive the Fair Teacher Dismissal Act. In addition, Charles and Antwan discuss all things happening in the Little Rock School District with Superintendent Michael Poore.
    • Dec 11, 2018
  • End of the week headlines and your open line

    Alderman candidate misses chance to cast deciding vote for himself in runoff election; Dem-Gaz to phase out print delivery in El Dorado, Camden and Magnolia; Rapert threatens UA Fort Smith over 'Drag Queen Story Time' event; The Van seeks to raise $35,000 in three weeks for new warehouse facility in South Little Rock.
    • Dec 7, 2018
  • More »

Latest in The Insider

  • All in the family

    Old habits die hard. We may have a new Republican majority in the legislature, but like the old Democratic majority, it still doesn't hurt to have a lawmaker spouse to land a part-time job during the legislative session.
    • Jan 30, 2013
  • 'Circuit breaker' legal

    When we first asked Gov. Mike Beebe about the "circuit breaker" idea out of Arizona (automatically opting out of Medicaid expansion if the feds reduce the matching rates in the future), he said it was fine but noted that states can already opt out at any time, an assurance he got in writing from the feds.
    • Jan 30, 2013
  • Church goes to school in Conway

    An interesting controversy is brewing in Conway Public Schools, periodically a scene of discord as more liberal constituents object to the heavy dose of religion that powerful local churches have tried to inject into the schools, particularly in sex education short on science and long on abstinence.
    • Jan 23, 2013
  • More »

Most Viewed

  • Kathy Webb wants to talk about the ‘good things’ happening in Little Rock

    As Kathy Webb enters her fifth year as Ward 3 city director her priorities include improving public safety; working to reduce poverty, hunger and homelessness; and making Little Rock a more sustainable city. One of Webb’s greatest concerns is the way in which the public image of the Little Rock School District impacts its students and teachers.

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2019 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation